New air tool...

  1. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,094
    Location:
    devon, uk
    It's not 100% as it should be yet, but I'm fairly impressed with this -



    If you built somthing like that now, you would have a microprocessor or two. This is old tech. The only electricity is driving the air compressor.

    Rise, fall, stroke, return all adjustable. Vac table gate valve driven by an actuator to grip the work as the cycle starts and release it at the end. A switch on the control panel to enter setup mode (where things can be manually driven). Full X/y and rotational (mechanical) adjustment on the bed for micro alignment. Stroke length adjustable. Even the downward blade pressure is pneumatically adjustable.

    I think they're about 2 decades old. I dread to think what they would have cost back then.


    They're printing presses. For silk screen flat work. Neither the blades, nor the screen are fitted in the vid.
     
    daleyd likes this.
  2. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,025
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    My first job after I left the navy back in 2000 was a field service engineer for screen printing machines, but ones used in the electronics manufacturing industry - they were used for printing solder paste onto circuit boards for smt and were massively accurate at aligning the boards and screen up, but the principle was almost exactly the same. They were all controlled by servo/stepper motors, the board came in and then the screen would move to align with the board, using a fancy split optic camera system for aligning the two.

    The company was the world leader in that technology, originally set up by a guy in Weymouth who started printing t shirts using a hand operated one.
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  3. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,094
    Location:
    devon, uk
    My only real concern with this one is the accuracy. Indeed im not even that bothered by accuracy, so long as I get great repeatability!

    A lot (well, most) of my work is printing around holes in sheet. So things like tick marks around dials, etc.

    I reckon you can just about see alignment issues down to about 0.05 mm with CNC engraving, which is virtually no offset at all.

    Id rather these presses were button opperated as then any slack will be more repeatable. Human interaction with the carriage just creates randomness. But that said the carridge return is quite fierce anyhow (adjustable, but it accelerates on the travel)

    I suspect a complete strip and rebuild would tighten things up a lot, but I want to see to start with if I'm anywhere near the right area of accuracy. I suspect it will be, but the whole purchase is a bit of a punt.
     
  4. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,025
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    Can you move the function of the handle to a remote push button, or does it require that you actually have to pull the carriage towards you?
     
  5. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,094
    Location:
    devon, uk
    You actually have to pull it. When up, it's just past the point of balance. So you pull it toward you to bring it off balance, where it then falls (rate of fall controllable) and the cycle starts.

    But...

    It's all a bit of a moot point anyhow, as the rising, at the end of the print cycle, is quite fierce, and will happily walk the machine (which is a strenuous 2 man lift) across the floor.

    The up stroke is adjustable, but too low, and there is not pressure enough to start the travel. And then, due to acceleration, or, probably, more likley, preferential working angles gained, as the carridge moves, it gets quite quick at the end of travel.

    The carridge seems fairly sturdy, and it's not like there is obvious slop. There are also nylon blocks to "locate" the falling carridge which could be shimmed up easy enough. At present they're not in contact at all and the clearence gap seems repeatable (by eye, not checked with feeler gauges, which, now that I've thought of it, wouldn't be a bad idea)

    I need to get some replacement parts from the manufacturer (still trading, although the parts will be made for me, rather than off the shelf) before I do any test prints, as, of course, they would also be a good way to test the machine out!
     
    daleyd likes this.
Advertisements