My Grandad in ww1

  1. magnet

    magnet Member

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    http://lwf.it.ox.ac.uk/s/lest-we-forget/item/894 This is my paternal Grandad this was compiled by one of my cousins. Thought some of the history buffs on here might find it interesting. Although i never met him i'm mighty proud of what he did........ Lest we forget.
     
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  2. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Bodger in chief

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    my great grandad aged 14ish. Went into the trenches and was shot and wounded almost exactly a month before the end of the war. Prior to that his company were present at pretty much every bloodbath going from the moment his boots hit France. Came home minus a leg and most of his buttock. In fact, this is the only photo we have of him with two legs
     
  3. magnet

    magnet Member

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    Superb mate another brave man.........Thanks for putting that up
     
  4. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Bodger in chief

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    Your post made me go and recheck his records, I’ve now learned when he was injured his battalion was taking part in the push to mons, and 3 days prior to his injury they had just arrived in Ath, Belgium. We never knew exactly where he was wounded, now we have it narrowed down
     
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  5. magnet

    magnet Member

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    https://southayrshirehistory.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/ayrshires-soldiers-at-gallipoli/ Im interested in where my grandad fought this tells part of the story. Unfortunately they were from an era that didn't talk about the war. On one of the rare occasions he told my father of how during a truce he was sent to clear the dead from the battle field and how when lifting the rotten corpses onto the stretchers the arms would detatch. Little wonder he would wake screaming in the night when my dad was a kid. What scars they must have carried.
     
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  6. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Bodger in chief

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    A like doesn’t seem appropriate for that. Gr grandad didn’t talk about the war, it was only after his records were uploaded last year we knew the extent of his wounds. When we told grandma it triggered a memory of her walking past his bedroom one night as a child and seeing him getting undressed, and she remembered seeing he had no buttocks, just a massive dip. She had forgotten that memory until then, having never put two and two together.
    She also told us that when she was born, he could afford the hospital bills so removed the padding from his stump and walked round until it was worn to the bone and bleeding so he could qualify for an extra hardship payment from his war pension
     
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  7. magnet

    magnet Member

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    Yes and they said they would come back to a land fit for heroes.........Bloody heart breaking when you hear things like that.
     
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  8. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

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    My maternal grandfather served in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment

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  9. ronan

    ronan Member

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    I bought the dvd of "They shall not grow old" by Peter Jackson and found it excellent, if grim. The first world war is more interesting than the second (imho). When you see people all around you, literally in pieces some of them, how could you ever hope to be normal or have a normal work or home life again ?
     
  10. taxi ray Member

    A bit later but my father in law was shot in ww2, he done the dd landings landing on gold beach, he was shot not long after landing, through the mouth, he was evacuated and ended up in a hospital at Basingstoke, whilst there his wife was told that he had had not much longer to live, she made the journey to the hospital,which due to the war took a very long time.

    He was operated on by harold gillies, and made a full recovery, although he often had flashbacks.

    When joining the army, he was in a reserved occupation.

    I believe that being shot saved his life.

    He was 94 when he died
     
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  11. magnet

    magnet Member

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    How indeed. What always strikes me about ww1 is the boyish excitment that seemed to prevail of how it would be a big adventure a bit like the 49ers on the klondike trail. Then the grim reality of the horror of war..........So sad
     
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  12. magnet

    magnet Member

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    After ww1 my grandad was in the blitz in ww2 london with the civil defense. God knows how he coped with that after all he had seen in Gallipoli.
     
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  13. ronan

    ronan Member

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    I remember in the early 90's, one of the UK tv stations showed a series of documentaries about ww1, and i have never seen them since, but they were really excellent. Probably they will never be seen again. I think they would have been made in the 50's or 60's. One part was just photographs of facial wounds the survivors were left with, absolutely horrific some of them, people missing Jaws and things like that, and the crude attempts at plastic surgery to heal them.
     
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  14. badabec

    badabec Forum Supporter

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    When my father was discharged from the army after WWII, he was given a card to claim his medals. Like many of his friends he tore it up and threw it away. Medals were the last thing he needed. I applied for his medals just before he died in 1999, they arrived with no problem. My father wasn't really interested in them.
    Medals for WWI aren't so easy, they can only replace medals that have been returned.
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/applying-for-medals
     
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  15. DAPPH

    DAPPH as dyslexik as I'm daft

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    WW1
    My Grandad was a Sergeant (volunteer ) in the Sheffield boys regiment . After the war it was several years before he regained custody of his three kids , who were put into Sheffield children's home a week after he went away , as their mum buggered off & left the 2 ,4& 5 yr olds locked in a bed room saying to the neighbour I'll be back around 15 :00 hrs . Two days later the neighbour went in the terraced dwelling & called the police when she saw the state of the abandoned kids.
    I'd love to know what became of her as my dad told me a few months before he died that her maiden name was Mary Dungworth , I've not been able to find that name anywhere but she certainly lived up to it .

    Grandad upped sticks in 1927 and moved them all to an old house in the middle of nowhere called Reed Point Holland Fen Lincolnshire . He'd made a lot of money running a fresh fish & game stall in Sheffield , once settled purchased 10 properties in the tiny village of Chapel hill that was some 8 miles or so away . He's the guy responsible for Sheffield'ers being the main freshwater fishermen in the UK as he'd rent the rooms out throughout the fishing season to his mates in Sheffield .. word spread .. a lot of guys were put up at well below the going rent if they had been injured or gassed . In the closed season he used it as a sort of respite centre for the guys who also had injuries & mental problems arising from WW1. Often paying for a whole family to come to Chapel Hill .

    Somewhere I have a picture that my dad said was Grandad in his " cor blimy trousers " ( shorts ) and pith hat fishing for Nile perch .
     
  16. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

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    3,303
    Essex England
    I wish i knew more of mine, we have a great grandad awarded the bravery in the field medal sadly all records where destroyed in a fire within he archives, as men didn't after he never passed along why he got the medal.
     
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  17. magnet

    magnet Member

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    https://www.youtube.com/user/docufans2/videos You might like the great war series on this channel:thumbup:
     
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  18. minimutly Member

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    Man? Looks like a very brave boy to me....
     
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  19. premmington

    premmington Member

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    I have great respect for the these brave young lads - who served in the forces thru two world wars - trench warfare and beach landings are not nice - horrific is a better description.

    My Grandfather was in the RAF and ended up in a Japanese WW2 POW camp - building the Thailand/Burma railway.

    He is long gone now - RIP - he did not drive a German car of have any consumer electrical goods from Japan in his house. There was no Honda lawnmowers in Grandads shed. If anything was made in Germany or Japan - he would not buy it. To his death - not single penny of his hard earned wages or pensions - knowingly ever funded the rebuilding of the German or Japenese economies.

    He used to drink sometimes in the local Legion club - I was told they tried to organise a trip to "Siam railway of death" - my Grandfather had no interest in a second visit. Nor did any of his mates who survived the first outing there.

    You could not get him to talk about it - only time he mentioned it was when Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh went to the state funeral of Emperor Hirohito in 1989.

    When Grandad learned of this - he stood up turned the TV off - half way thru the report. He barked a few things out about "the greek idiot and a lack of respect" - then never mentioned it again. My Nan told me - after the fact. Grandad cancelled his news papers for about a month and stopped watching the news on the TV - and listening to his radio. I assume he did'nt want to hear/read about it - or it was a little old mans silent protest.

    My Grandfather was the only person in my whole life who thought dropping a couple of Atom bombs on mainland Japan was a good idea. For a quite man he had very strong views on the cold war and Nuclear disarmament - very anti CND and very pro building nuclear subs. I don't think he was a warmonger - but he believed very strongly in the concept of a "credible nuclear deterrent".
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2020
  20. ronan

    ronan Member

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    dublin
    I think he was correct on that point, if it weren't for the nukes and the American/British bases in Germany, we'd have been over run by the russians years ago, after all they did keep what they overrun in eastern Europe.
     
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