Monarch 10EE DRO install

  1. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I just thought I'd record the installation of my DRO that came today. This is not going to be a 1000-page epic just a rundown of the installation techniques. Hopefully someone can draw inspiration from it.

    First job (because it's the easy bit is fit the x-axis scale. The bed is quite flat but not quite good enough so I had to make some 3-point stand-offs to hold the carrier.

    Here's one of the stand-offs fitted. I have milled a groove in the front to hold the support rail and machined away most of the back leaving just two corner 'feet'. Only had to remove a couple of mm for this machine. The M6 hole is tapped into the bed and the M8 grub screw is for jacking it square.

    x scale 1.jpg

    Here's the rail fitted in the stand-off.

    x scale 2.jpg

    Underside view showing the feet. It's important to use a 3-point system for stuff like this. 4-points is no good it would drive you crazy trying to get it level.

    x scale 3.jpg

    How to square the stand-off to the bed.

    x scale 4.jpg

    Once it was all square I super-glued the stand-offs to the rail and levelled it off. The super-glue isn't really necessary I just got fed up with the blocks jumping out of the very shallow channel I milled for them.

    x scale 5.jpg

    Now I have a good base to fit the rail to which will make adjusting it easy. More later...
     
  2. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    essex england
    Accuracy now pays dividends

    What make dro are you using pete?
     
  3. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Just a £300 glass scale Sino. I think they are 5 micron resolution, dunno what the accuracy is. I think there's a calibration feature in the unit so I could use gauge blocks to check it out and adjust if necessary.

    You're right about 'accuracy now' I wanted a rock solid mount hence the overkill stand-off blocks. The half-thou indicator reads the same at the mount points but the actual bar itself isn't dead straight, has about a thou and a half bow in it. Good enough as I'll indicate the scale itself when I fit it.
     
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  4. Spark plug

    Spark plug Member

    Messages:
    3,403
    Location:
    Durham, England
    Looking good, it doesn’t matter how many times I run the indicator along the scale, I hate tightening the read head down for the first time.
     
  5. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Packed up to see the New Year in with the family before I get lynched :D

    I found a piece of 3/8" gauge plate and milled a small step in the end. A dowel hole and a couple of M8 bolt holes and you can't see it but I milled a 5 thou relief across the holes to make sure the plate pulls up flat.

    x reader 1.jpg

    Drilled a tapped after clamping and tapping tight up against the shoulder. Now it's bolted up it's rock solid.

    x reader 2.jpg

    Got a chunk of heavy ally angle to bolt to the rear of this to carry the read head. Tomorrow's work.
     
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  6. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I got my chunk of ally milled to hold the reader head. I milled a recess in the back to locate it on the gauge plate hanger so it always clamped up nice and square. Slotted the hanger and drilled & tapped the angle for two M8 bolts. Then I milled slots in the bottom for the reader head screws. The instructions called for a 1.3mm space +/- 0.25mm so I found a rule from a protractor which was 1.2mm thick and used that for a spacer.

    x reader 3.jpg

    Next I had to mill some recesses in the cover to go around my stand-off blocks and allow for gap adjustment. Also slotted the screw holes and put some access holes in the front for the adjuster screws.

    x scale cover.jpg

    Here it is all installed. Just need to sort the cable run which will be done when the z-scale is fitted.

    x scale 6.jpg

    Nice even gaps all the way along.

    gaps.jpg
     
  7. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Cross-slide scale install. (It's just occurred to me that I've mis-labelled the long axis as x (when it should be z) so I'm calling these pics cross scale so I don't have to re-name and re-upload all the pics).

    So, start off with the easy bit - fitting the scale mount. The cross slide is nicely square so it was just a matter of milling a new pocket for the screw and fitting it. I levelled it with the DTI as before.

    cross scale 1.jpg

    Now the difficult bit. The reader head bolts to the saddle casting, which is rough-cast. They give you this bracket which if you fit it to the reader head and fit the scale up nearly touches in one corner - it's just 5 thou away. I had to figure a way of fixing it to the rough casting without having the room for a stand-off like before, so this is what I did. I drilled and tapped the four corners for four grub screws.

    cross scale 2.jpg

    The reader head is fitted with the yellow plastic 'keepers' that hold it in the right position for transport and to aid install, so they hold it in the position it's going to be fixed, more or less. To set the screws so they just touch I put a DTI against the reader head and gently snugged up the screws, watching the DTI for movement. As soon as it moves, the screw is touching. I did each of the four in turn then checked them.

    cross scale 3.jpg

    Next I had to spot the two bolt holes. I had a broken 6mm carbide end mill that I had ground to be an engraving point. This was a perfect fit in the slots so I used it to mark the locations.

    punch 1.jpg
    punch 2.jpg

    After Drilling and tapping the bolt holes I fixed it in place with two fixing bolts (again using the DTI to keep location, then removed the scale to check the alignment. I checked the vertical face with a square.

    cross scale 4.jpg

    Then I checked the front-back alignment both vertical and horizontal with a DTI, making adjustments to give less than half a thou run-out each way.

    cross scale 5.jpg

    After that I fitted the scale and reader up, checked it all over for alignment (it was good) so I took out the screws one at a time and used high strength threadlock to fix them all in place. This is important so it doesn't rattle loose if I get any tool chatter. I didn't threadlock the reader head to the mount so it can be dis-mounted if necessary. Also I drilled and tapped a M6 thread just visible to the right for a stop bolt.

    cross scale 6 .jpg

    After that I just gave it a final check to be sure.

    cross scale 7.jpg

    Once I was happy I fitted the cover, and the stop bolt which will stop the tailstock from smashing into the reader head.

    Tailstock stop.jpg
     
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  8. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Just the cable routes left to do. I utilised an existing hole to clip the cross slide scale cable onto the wing of the saddle, then figured out the best route to keep them tidy and out of the way of cleaning up swarf. Here is the saddle at both ends of travel.

    cables 1.jpg

    cables 2.jpg

    And that's it. Need a few more P-clips to tidy the last of the cabling so I'll print a few off I think.

    Thanks for watching :)
     
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  9. Bill Edwards Member

    Messages:
    4,880
    Location:
    Scarborough, North Yorkshire
    Good job, as always!

    I'm struggling to ignore the fact that I need a DRO on the mill and should have one on the lathe too, but it's not something I want to have to do.
     
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  10. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Thanks Bill. A DRO totally transforms a mill. I've had one on mine for years but been using the lathe on the dials. A few times I've done stuff that made me wish I'd got one and what with having a month off work over the break I decided now was the time. Just got some parameters to set now as it's reading miles out on the x scale. Must be set for a scale of a different resolution.
     
  11. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    essex england
    I like to space crossfeed encoders out of the way towards the rear of the machine out of harms way and to keep every bit of room for the tailstock
     
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  12. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I would have liked to do that too but the taper attachment is right in the way and the cross slide is only about 2/3 length. Also the scale site above a wiper block which the tailstock stopped against, and the tailstock has a full width wiper block on it too, so it's not losing a huge amount of travel.
     
  13. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Well I've found out why my DRO is reading wrong - I ordered 5um scales and they've supplied me one 5um and one 1um, which you'd normally pay extra for.

    I'm calling it a Christmas bonus :D
     
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  14. jenki Member

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    197
    Location:
    Carmarthen, S Wales
    Nice work Pete thank you for the information.
     
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  15. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    essex england
    I hope you complained :D
     
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  16. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    8,589
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Not happy with the flimsy P clips I 3-d printed some better ones. It tidies the scale cables right up.

    clips.jpg
     
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  17. Bill Edwards Member

    Messages:
    4,880
    Location:
    Scarborough, North Yorkshire
    Back in my college days the mill had a DRO, many years later I've got myself a mill without.
    Same with the lathe, but that I can manage. No DRO on a mill is a complete nightmare especially when you learnt with one. Really makes hard work of everything, much more working out is needed for the most simple tasks.
     
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  18. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    essex england
    Ive fitted hundreds of dro’s but Im finding it impossible to fit them on my machinery. Not a hard job when you’ve got machinery to make brackets.
    I got a quote from a dro supplier to supply and fit a dro and it was expensive enough
    1 I never charged enough
    2 The price they want exceeds my hourly rate greatly
    2 I wouldn’t be happy with the fit

    Just make your self do it!
     
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  19. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,027
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    It's not hard, except on the pocket - and that's not as bad as it was, anyway. Well, until the pound tanks again...

    Essentials are a decent DTI and magnetic stand to get the scales *exactly* parallel with the slide movements and the plates with grubscrews for adjustment - often the hardest bit is working out how / where to fit to avoid dangly bits like taper attachments, making sure there's clearance like with the tailstock meeting the reader head etc. - I've done quite a few, not rocket surgery :)

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
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