How would you do this ?

  1. Dvddvddvd Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    York
    I want to make some rustic or distressed looking picture/sign frames..

    So I bought some 30mm x 30mm x 3mm mild steel angle.

    I cut it at 45 degrees and clampled it up ready to weld.

    I want it to look after grinding as one piece so you can not see the 45 degree corners.

    Would it be better to weld the joints from the inside (you dont see the inside) and then grind the front side flat or weld from both sides, maybe only put a tiny bead on the front and grind the front flat?

    I have a GYS smartmig 162.

    thanks
     
  2. Dvddvddvd Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    York
    Im using flux core 0.9mm wire
     
  3. bricol Member

    Messages:
    1,508
    N.Yorks, UK
    Bevel the ends on the front side, clamp, weld, grind weld flush - if you've got a decent bevel on them, they will stay together - only picture frames after all. If you want them to survive a nuclear war, weld the inside if you want.
     
    metalmelt and MattF like this.
  4. Dvddvddvd Member

    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    York
    Thanks im new to welding but i set up my welder with the smartmig settings 3mm steel / 0.9 wire etc and it did weld but the size of the weld was a good 10mm x 5mm and so took a bit of grinding. Would it be better to turn down the wire speed so the weld is a lot smaller so easier to grind? Seems pointless having the large weld and then grinding it off ?
     
  5. mdr

    mdr Collector of welding machines

    Messages:
    344
    Location:
    wye-on-earth
    Options (my two cents):

    Swap to .8 wire; or turn both the settings down (the welder's settings are only a guide and it's a picture frame after all); or move quicker (your puddle is too big); or try overlapping tacks rather than a straight bead (position on the thinnest edge first and pull the trigger for a second, move a fraction and repeat until you get to the other edge - just make sure the previous track hasn't cooled/ is still glowing when you pull the trigger again so you don't get porosity from the flux; you have to be quick and consistent); practice practice practice.

    If I was doing it I may clamp first in a perfect 90 and then run the grinder across the interface of the two pieces to gouge a place for the weld to go. Reason being is that if you have already cut the pieces to a perfect 45 degrees and they marry together perfectly you could mess that up with careless grinding of a bevel.
     
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