Help for a newbie

  1. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    Hello all
    New to the forum, and to welding.
    I am researching my first MIG machine and could do with some sensible advice please.
    Total novice welder, I understand the theory but have not had the practice.
    Currently restoring an old motorbike and need to do some rear fender fabrication and weld on mounting tabs etc to the frame.
    Frame thickness 3mm, mounting tabs 6.5mm, all mild steel
    Older Motorcycles are typical of what I will be playing about with.
    Living in Dubai, there is no such thing as the ‘hobbyist welder’ so the selection of machines is poor. Either generic Chinese which I can’t get background spec info on or some ESAB units which I can’t afford.
    Ideally I want a machine which will do me for a few years; it’ll be sporadic projects on motorbikes etc.
    I’ve come across the Telwin Technomig 210 which seems to be ok and is a multiprocess machine for approx £450 new set up for gas less MIG. I will be using Gas MIG as I’ve been told it’s better to use.

    From you experienced folk, does the technomig 210 sound suitable for my needs?

    Also, when people talk about ‘you need x amps to weld x mm thick material’ what are you actually looking for here? For example, From what I’ve read, 140 amps is required for 4mm thick mild steel, but if I have a 4mm thick piece of mild steel, surely I don’t want to weld all the way through it? What is my reference point - if I have a 4mm thick steel, am I trying to weld 2mm of that and so need only say 100amps, confused on this one.

    Appreciate any pointers you can give

    thanks very much
     
  2. bourbon Member

    Messages:
    802
    Location:
    Lichfield UK
    This may sound like a really idiotic question. But what is the main voltage in Dubai? Something I have never given much thought to
     
    Mark 2 likes this.
  3. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    same system as U.K. 230v
    Same 3 pin plug

    that raises another question, at what point can you no longer connect a welding machine to a regular mains socket?
     
  4. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England
    If you're on the type G (I think...) plug, you'll probably also be limited to 13 amps. That probably tops out at 150 amps welding current, which is less than the Technomig 210, but if you run it at lower currents it wont trip a breaker. If you need higher currents, you can have a 16 amp or 32 amp socket fitted if you've got the mains available to do it. I imagine someone might suggest you have an inline breaker on the socket just incase you overdo it but my electrical knowledge is limited.

    General rule of thumb on current required to weld is to convert the metric dimension into inches:
    4mm / 25.4 = 0.157

    Then multiply by one thousand:
    0.157 * 1000 = 157 amps.

    It is only rule of thumb though. Plus you can add chamfers to the material to make it thinner where you're welding. Generally you do want to weld all the way through something, otherwise the unwelded bit can behave like a crack, and pull through the weld - depending on if it sees any bending or tension in use.
     
  5. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    Hi

    hi. Yes, it is type G

    appreciate your help. I’ll have to give more thought to this set up.
     
  6. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,484
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    What type of bike frame is it, Ive never cut one up where the tube was 3mm thick, 2 maybe less, tabs at probably 4mm.

    150amp machine will do most what you want to keep the costs down, make sure what ever you buy has a low minimum of 30 amps for the tin work. So of the reall cheapies have 40 or 50 amp minimums.
     
  7. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Welcome aboard, @Tedders :waving: I can't comment on the specific machine you mention, but the green buttons [tutorials] at the top of the page are a good starting point for technique. :thumbup:
     
  8. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    Thanks. It’s a 2000 harley. Frame wall thickness 0.12inch (3mm)

    the mounting brackets ive got are 1/4inch thick (approx 6.5mm)

    So For 6.5mm thickness I need around 200amps but f I am welding it to a 3mm thick frame piece I assume I select the amps based on the thinnest piece or will blow through. But will this go deep enough through the 6.5mm piece? This is what is confusing me a bit.

    I’m reading what I can but still not clear.
     
  9. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    Thank you. working my way through. Need to get a welding machine sorted so I can practice
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  10. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,484
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Thought all you American iron boys used a tig for such things. The heavy tube would explain why they are so heavy.

    One thing you can do on bike frames it heat the metal to straw yellow then weld, you get better penetration with preheated metal. But why over complicate things when you dont need too.

    Still think youll be fine with a 150 amp machine. Dont forget youll weld both sides of your bracket.

    But can you get mig gas in Dubai too
     
  11. Will! Member

    Messages:
    98
    Location:
    Derby - England

    If you weld both sides, you technically only need 3.25mm penetration (it wont be that clear cut though), or you could bevel it at 45 degrees, so you've not got as much material to weld through.
     
  12. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    yeah TIG is what most use when building bikes professionally, especially the custom scene. But the factory welds on my bike are very clumpy in places and light years away from the TIG you see on new frames. These Harleys really are tractors.

    My bike is definitely not a show bike, it just needed some tlc after 20 years so it is a good opportunity to completely strip it and do the mods I’ve been planning for a few years.

    Appreciate your advice on the 150 amps, thanks.

    Argon/CO2 mix is available if you search it out. I’ve located a couple of places so should be fine.
     
  13. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    ok, understood and appreciated. Need to get practising, thanks
     
  14. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    I settled on the Telwin technomig 210 dual synergy. MIG/TIG/STICK

    Let’s see how this goea
     
  15. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    41A4F80A-5677-4FCB-9FF7-7C02A69778AA.jpeg Best laid plans.....
    So the company who was getting me the technomig couldn’t get it, and now no other supplier can either, so I bought a £100 Chinese MIG 175
    Practice began today
     
  16. eddie49 Member

    Looks good. That is about £100 less than the price for a similar box here in the UK. So living in a tax haven has some advantages....
     
  17. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    Dubai, and the UAE in general, is a tremendous place.
     
  18. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,484
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Bit warm, snow doesnt last long!
     
  19. Tedders New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Dubai UAE
    We make our own snow......

    check out ski dubai
     
  20. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    I may soon be in a position to send you some - these were taken in April 2018 and they're forecasting the same, if not worse, this Winter. :mad:

    IMG_20180302_112306.jpg

    IMG_20180302_131206.jpg
     
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