GYS or R-Tech

  1. Splintered New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Chesterfield, Derbyshire
    Morning All,
    I'm new to this metal burning, having spent the last 10 years or so in woodworking. I've a number of projects around the house and garden that will require welding, so I've just sold my table saw to release some cash and now I'm in the market for a reasonable unit. I'm also looking at doing a few short courses once the lockdown lifts.

    Projects that I'll be working on include a new side gate, workbench, garden seating, and industrial style shelving. All will include elements of timber as well.

    I guess I'll mostly be using box section, angle and flat bars, but would like the option of coping with thicker sections up to say 8-10mm.

    MIG and Stick are the processes I'm looking at, but like the option of having a limited TIG capability for later.

    I've a double garage/workshop with 13amp at present, but easily upgradeable to 16/32 at the cost of an electrician.

    I was swaying towards the R-Tech 250, until I came across a number of reviews and recommendations for the GYS Multi Pearl 200 4XL. What I like about the latter is its capable of 200A output on a 13amp supply. The savings I'd make on not having the electrician part justifies the cost difference of the 2. I also like the Synergic interface, taking some of the guesswork out of it. What I dont like is the 2 year warranty compared to the 3 years on R-Tech.

    Anyone care to help me decide, as I need to get moving on these projects before the wife finds a use for the table saw money
     
    tom2207 likes this.
  2. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    5,826
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    R tech gets praise for customer service when they break down, but never heard the need to use the GYS support.

    Sure there will be some usful input in a bit
     
    Splintered and Dcal like this.
  3. arther dailey Member

    Messages:
    3,730
    Location:
    Southampton England
    Welcome , and I am sure some of the guys with these machines will have a word about the pro s and cons soon enough. There are a lot of very talented guys on here you can learn a lot ,enjoy
     
    Splintered likes this.
  4. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    There does seem to be a lot of folk wanting to weld 8 to 10 mm steel , , thats a fair undertaking at a home workshop level.
    portability would be one of the big factors in machine choice , lots of good second hand stuff about at great prices if you dont have to lug it about.
     
    Bbe555 and Splintered like this.
  5. Splintered New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Chesterfield, Derbyshire
    Hi, thanks for the reply. It's just having the capability of that thickness should the need arise. I'm a great believer in buying once and not upgrading in a year or so.

    I cant see me taking it out of the workshop, as I've a good workspace for the projects I've lined up. Cheers.
     
  6. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    worry more about how it will weld 1mm , you will spend a lot more time at three mm and under than you will over five.
    If your not taking it out of the workshop your laughing ,,, loads of choices , next issue is budget.
     
    skotl, Bbe555 and Mark 2 like this.
  7. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    5,826
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    I agree. But welding a 10mm sq bar into a railing, is a different ball game to a structural weld on two pieces of 10mm plate.
    If you park the limited tig ability, an oxford big single phase could give you the 20 amps up to 330 I think on single phase. I have a 270-1 and stick tractor buckets etc back together with it, did the structural steels in my barn conversion too no issue, but also does .8 sheet no problem. And its not full of fancy electronics.
     
    Mark 2, roofman and tom2207 like this.
  8. eddie49 Member

    This single phase Oxford "Migmaker" ranges from 40 to 280 Amps, and it does have a capacitor bank:
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Oxford-2...elder-excellent-condition-No-Vat/264739434758
    The wirefeed is geared, but only 2 roll, not 4. The Seller reckons you can bring the 40 Amp low end down by using 0.6mm wire.
    This model was apparently built by TecArc for Spaldings, an agricultural supply company in Lincolnshire.
     
  9. Ian-Essex Member

    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    UK
    I've just purchased the GYS 2004XL and cannot fault it. Only welded some car body panel, some motorcycle frame (steel) and finally some 10mm to 10mm plate (MMA) as I was wanting to give it a try on a 13a socket. Performed all perfectly, couldn't fault it. GYS service excellent as the first unit arrived smashed to pieces by the courier, I must say GYS packaging did leave a bit to be desired, but nevertheless all sorted out in a matter of 2 days. I am a happy customer atm.
     
    tom2207 and Splintered like this.
  10. arther dailey Member

    Messages:
    3,730
    Location:
    Southampton England
    sounds good ,would like to see pics of 10mm to10mm stick weld if poss,what rods did you use? thanks
     
  11. Splintered New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Chesterfield, Derbyshire
    Thanks for the feedback.
    Where did you purchase from?
     
  12. Ian-Essex Member

    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    UK
    From a company called TBWS
     
  13. Ian-Essex Member

    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    UK
    I used a 5mm rod, I don't know what type it was as I was doing this in a friends garage and just what he had, was on some 10mm plate scraps. Sorry I do not have any pics of this. I also tested the mig synergic settings on this scrap piece at full power with a triangular weave motion, this also looked good. But I am not a professional welder, a guy who messes about in the shed who's owned a welder for 25 years, So possibly for the purist wishing to take x rays and section cuts for penetration verification this probably isn't a conducive test but I was happy with the results.
     
    Splintered and a111r like this.
  14. arther dailey Member

    Messages:
    3,730
    Location:
    Southampton England
    dont confuse me with an expert ! just a few pics to show how well it came out would have been good , fact being thats what was done on a 13 amp plug was what I wanted to see. cheers
     
  15. Ian-Essex Member

    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    UK
    I was surprised too nothing tripped or blew.....it was only a short 2" run, so maybe hitting this kind of thickness for any kind of time would have tripped /blew a fuse. This was why I did it to see what I could get away with.

    On a separate note I think the only comment I would make, not negatively but being a little surprised when unpackaging the unit, is the physical size of this welder, its quite big tbh, obvious when you think about it as it can take a 15kg spool! It was bigger than the impression I had in my mind classic mistake when distance buying! In hindsight I think the Kemppi Minimig was something I was after more size wise as also this welder has the more compact torch / connection for storage etc, but it wasn't multi process so I didn't pursue this option.

    I also purchased the spool conversion for the smaller reels of specialist 'expensive' wires as I want to play with stainless and aluminium at some point.
     
    Splintered and arther dailey like this.
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