Fire extinguisher???

  1. marknotgeorge

    marknotgeorge Doing sums for a living since 2009.

    Messages:
    474
    Derby, UK
    Hi, quick introduction. I've been reading the forum for a month or so now, and have got hold of a Cosmo 130 Mig to help me restore my 1980 Triumph TR7 Sprint DHC. I've been practising with the gasless wire wot came with it, and chances are I'll upgrade to gas when that runs out.

    I know I need to get a fire extinguisher before I start for real, but was wondering what size. From what I've heard, a CO2 one would be best. I've got a normal sized shed, and a double garage. 2kg? 5kg? Help!
     
  2. jolly_roger187

    jolly_roger187 Member

    Messages:
    93
    Nottingham
    Hi Mark (not george?)

    Fire extinguishers eh? Good question, cought my eye. Well..... I once let off a 2kg co2 extinguisher in a empty living room, (Supposed to be removing a chimney breast) Bit of a giggle at the time..... But i almost suffocated a collegue!! I was supprised at how much acctually came out, if the unfortunate event ever happend, the 2kg co2 has my vote..... Especially in confined spaces. (just make sure you clean up before the boss comes back!!!)
     
  3. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Fire extinguishers......

    I set fire to a car once. (Somebody else's car). I was amazed at how quickly the flames spread. Time passes very slowly in that sort of situation. After figuring out I couldn't beat out the fire I ran for the extinguisher, and then spent a lot of seconds trying to figure out how to get the plastic tie and ring pull out (fire spreads even more quickly). Can't get it out - tried just squeezing the trigger..... Nope - bent the trigger. Don't panic - spend some time ripping the not easy to rip plastic thing off then removing the pin. Try to put the fire out - won't work - handle bent due to previous panic. Straighten handle and it works. Fire out in seconds.

    My approach to fire extinguishers these days is to buy a big one. I think mine was 10kg (about 2 feet tall), but then it's foam and that's heavier. I think that equates to a 5kg C02 extinguisher. I used quite a lot of it putting the fire out. For my new extinguisher I have the plastic tie removed ready for my panic.

    For the choice of extinguisher - I use foam which is fine until you spray it onto the welder, then you get zapped (foam contains water). CO2 is probably the best option. although I've never used one. I'd imagine powder wouldn't put out the underneath of the flaming roof.

    Buy a big extinguisher. You'll hopefully never be thankful that you did, but if you have to use it you'll be very thankful.
     
  4. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    I have a 5kg Co2 i keep in my van for any site welding.

    A friend of mine was welding up his car on evening at work, when it caught fire....
    He just picked it up on the forklift and put it in the middle of the yard and let it burn :lol:
     
  5. jolly_roger187

    jolly_roger187 Member

    Messages:
    93
    Nottingham
    ^...... Or you could just buy a bigger one!! :D

    Good advise from Malc........ Remember that co2 is actually partly designed for electrical fire purposes, (wouldent want your welder wet now would we?). This thread has promt me to get an extinguisher now so..... Cheers!
     
  6. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Keep a bucket of water (with a big rag floating inside) handy too. Fire extinguishers cost money and it would be a pain to use one unless you really have to.

    Prevention and planning is good. I have to do some welding soon where there is some old cloth tape immediately behind the weld that I can't access. I'll wet it, place a wet cloth above, and keep a water spray and a small (cheap) extinguisher handy just in case. B*ggered if I'm spending another £80 putting out a fire.
     
  7. marknotgeorge

    marknotgeorge Doing sums for a living since 2009.

    Messages:
    474
    Derby, UK
    So it sounds like as big as I can get hold of then. Thanks :D
     
  8. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    I didnt mention it was a Renault5 did I :lol:
     
  9. Phill Member

    Messages:
    13
    Berkshire
    :lol: best thing for it in my opinion
     
  10. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    You are both meanies :shock:

    Renaults are fine vehicles that fully justify loss of life while protecting them from fire. (This site came about after a discussion on a Renault 4 forum.)
     
  11. konzonn Member

    Messages:
    2
    could you weld in shed it is just some sheds advatise as worktshops would these be sutible
     
  12. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Welcome to the forum konzonn. I wouldn't be too worried about welding in a wooden shed - welding sparks will tend to land on the floor so as long as that is concrete you should be OK. Keep a fire extinguisher handy and be careful.

    It's worth keeping the shed tidy - if the welding set fire to a rag then that could get enough heat up to set the shed on fire. Makes sense to take extra care when angle grinding to - sparks from that directed at the wall could have enough heat in them to start a fire.

    With a wooden shed especially it's sensible to stick around for 20 minutes after you've finished welding and grinding so you can spot any fires that might be smoldering away.
     
  13. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    Sparks on wire wool can start a fire VERY easily, so keep your wooly wire in a cupboard safe.
     
  14. wicamron Member

    Messages:
    7
    fife,scotland
    Hello
    I use 2 x 5kg c02 extinguishers , one for the prevention of a fire and the other i have fitted a gauge and a clamp to hold the extinguisher open,i use as my c02 bottle for my mig welder,costs approx £15.00 to fill at any fire service facillity and lasts for ages,because the small gas bottles only lasts a few hours and casts a fortune.
    regards wicamron
     
  15. pdevlin Member

    Messages:
    1
    Rochdale
    Hi all, just joined the forum, some really usefull stuff on here

    I have recently bought a MIG welder to do some patching on my Landrover 101 chassis.

    I have been pondering the risk of fire as my chassis has been waxoyled both in side the box sections and oustside.

    Any thoughts / suggestions


    Paul.
     
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