Cordless Ratchet Wrench

  1. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,122
    Location:
    Wight
    Quite fancy a 3/8th one of these, use it like a ratchet then push the button to whiz in or out. Not spending out on a Milwaukee but the Sealey CP1202 looks ok around £85 inc batteries.
    Unfortunately Bosch (that I have batteries for) don't seem to do one. Any other suggestions/ recommendations for a home mechanic?
     
  2. seriesonewelder Member

    Messages:
    306
    West Midlands
    The magazine car mechanics have done a test of ratchets in the latest issue. I flicked through it the other day whilst in the man aisle in tesco the other day. Sorry I don't remember which they 'liked' the best....
     
  3. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    505
    Location:
    Leeds
  4. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,321
    Location:
    moscow on thames
    I have air ratchets and I cant remember the last time I used them, just dont seem worth the effort to fetch and connect. Do these battery ratchets eat batteries and are they actually compact enough to poke in places where they would be of use? Genuine question and nothing to do with urine extraction.

    Bob
     
  5. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    2,455
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    I like the look of the new fuel extra reach ones!

    But can't justify the cost atm
     
  6. steveo3002 Member

    Messages:
    5,030
    cambridge uk
    having a hard time convincing myself i would use these , most tough bolts like suspension etc you can get a impact gun at it , lighter stuff isnt much bother using hand tools ? and theyre still so big you couldnt get em in half the places ?
     
  7. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    2,455
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    I wouldn't be using one for suspension work tbh.
     
  8. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,122
    Location:
    Wight
    I have been watching a lot of auto diagnosis videos (picking up on some oscilloscope training), and they certainly seem to be useful - I had not appreciated that you just use them like a normal ratchet to start/finish, with the motor doing the low torque part.

    They seem to be about the same size as an air ratchet.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sealey-CP1...87&hvtargid=pla-445130944514&psc=1&th=1&psc=1

    Watching the South Main Auto guy (great channel as recommended by @rikrobson ) he uses one a lot and for getting down the front of an engine with limited space they seem to be the mutts.
     
    Agrismith likes this.
  9. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Had a snap on one in the workshop shared box where I used to work, was so powerful it could snap wheelarch liner bolts!

    You can use the snap on one as a ratchet and not damage it with no power

    The batteries are a sod to remove
     
  10. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Would be worth seeing how much batteries are
     
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  11. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    5,957
    Location:
    Essex
    Don’t muck about with Sealey. Snap On or Milwaukee.

    I’d have the snap on.
     
  12. armalites Member

    Messages:
    4,052
    Herefordshire
    I think if you a doing repetitive work then then they are useful just for buzzing things up before final torque. Cylinder head work is a good example.

    Sadly it's only a couple of the major brands that do them.

    Milwaukee obviously had some strength issues with the head because they've made the head on the latest ones pretty chunky compared to early ones.

    According to the Snap On guy many people who were using the regular ones have gone over to the long reach ones.

    I have Dewalt kit and they don't do one but weirdly MAC do one that uses Dewalt 10.8v batteries.

    I have been tempted to buy a Milwaukee or a Snap On due to the compact size.

    I appreciate everyone has to draw a line somewhere but this is 100% one of those tools where there will be a big difference with a Snap On or Milwaukee, the difference won't be directly relative to the price difference but you won't regret buying one.
     
    stuvy likes this.
  13. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,122
    Location:
    Wight
    Cant justify the extra for me. £75 for a Sealey £150 minimum for a Milwaukee - sure Snap-on would be eye watering!

    @stuvy about £75 all in at FFX (but their store is broken at the moment.) but for an extra tenner the kit gets you another battery and a bag you probably don't want
     
    stuvy likes this.
  14. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    @Wightsparks just been on there site and saw this

    Would be good just for the spare drill

    And it’s only £15 for a genuine battery and the same for a charger
     
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  15. Kayos

    Kayos Member

    Messages:
    4,736
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Just like the drill thread it comes down to usage

    If I could get a Makita one that uses batteries I already have I would but I wouldn't spend Milwaukee money on something to be used every couple of months
     
    stuvy likes this.
  16. mr haynes Member

    Messages:
    276
    Location:
    uk
    I would say for the home mechanic it would definitely be a luxury item. Never really got on with the air ratchet in the workshop, too much hassle, more often than not, trying to get decent access. Being old school i also like to "feel" the torque especially when loosening.
    And yes it was a Snap On sitting in the toolbox not earning its place
     
    steveo3002 likes this.
  17. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,122
    Location:
    Wight
    Yep that's why I want a ratchet and not a right angle impact driver - too much opportunity for destruction otherwise!
     
    stuvy likes this.
  18. keithski122 Member

    Messages:
    876
    uk
    I used to use my air ones quite a bit.1/4 drive great for cam belt cover bolts,wheel arch trims, 3/8 for gearbox bolt removal, clutch bolts, exhaust bolts.Not quite as much power as an impact gun and the 3/8 would take bolts up to a nice torque without overdoing it.
     
    Ruffian likes this.
  19. knighty Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,698
    Location:
    Sunderland
    I've got the Milwaukee one, really like it, handy when you've got a dozen bolts to do, or really long bolts

    only complaint is the mechanics I know who use them complain they're not used to manual ones anymore, so if it breaks a days graft kills their arms :-o
     
    Wallace likes this.
  20. premmington

    premmington Member

    Messages:
    1,239
    Location:
    Norfolk

    Dito... I have 1/2 and 3/8 air ratchets and never use them - ever. There is no feeling to final torque with them - so the the time saved is lost - getting a tool for the final "nip up". Use of these has been replaced by compact 3/8 impact guns.

    But a 1/4 air ratchet is "differing kettle of fish". I got a tiny Midland one from the USA - it is old and does not have paddle trigger - it has a push switch either side for forward and reverse - I have fitted a long soft flexi trailing air hose to it (the Midland tool is small - a standard PCL air chuck is nearly bigger).

    Nothing is better for working about engines - when you can't get a throw in degrees on a manual ratchet. The Midland tool has clutch type ratchet with no teeth - so no set back and forward throw is required.

    Lad who works for me has a snap on one - I can't get on with the paddle trigger - by the time I have threaded it round things in an engine bay - I keep setting it off by fouling the trigger.
     
    Maker, stuvy and 8ob like this.
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