Bandsaw notching.

  1. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    It's certainly no new thing but it surprises me how little it's thought of when diy fabricators talk about tube notching.
    I don't own a tube notcher yet I work with it a lot at home carrying out all my notching on my saw.
    For sensible money it doesn't get any easier IMO. I can't stand the hole saw type particularly if you have a lot to do and it's reasonably thick wall. Any how I thought I'd ask what you guys do
    Pics from the other day messing about which made me think about asking the question.
    Takes less than 15 mins start to finish.
    Set angles on saw (I use this tube a lot so I have my angle marked for notching it.
    3 quick cuts. (I like a flat on the front I find it welds better on the meeting point.)
    Tack it and whip round.
     
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  2. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

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    Each to their own
    I'd have 5+ done in that time, with a notcher
     
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  3. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Not welded you wouldn't shox.
    "Start to finish".
     
  4. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    I can make 3 cuts on my saw in less than 2 minutes.
     
  5. HughF

    HughF Member

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    Very interested to see this in the flesh when I'm up later this year. Is it difficult figuring out the angles to cut at?
     
  6. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Yes it is to start off. I've done it like this for a number of years and had them all marked up on my saws I've owned. Lots of trial and error to start but once you have them it's just note and repeat. I'm sure there are ways to work it out but making some scrap is more fun.
     
  7. HughF

    HughF Member

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    Can I wing-it with my portaband? :p
     
  8. zx9

    zx9 Member

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    @Richard. the two cuts are at 45 Deg. and you then take the ends of the 'fish mouth?' off ? Or have I got the wrong idea?
     
  9. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    No. It varies depending on diameter. That tube in the pic is 40mm. Cut Angles from the centre
    Those were 35° then I took 3mm off the front.
     
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  10. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Yes. I've done it with angle grinders when I've had too. The trick is getting the cuts to meet exactly in the centre.
     
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  11. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Ok I'll explain to those that haven't tried it. There are probably lots of yt vids on it with the Americans doing it (badly) but this is my way and it works.
    The angle was actually 36° when I measured.
    See pics of the one I've just done now.
     
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  12. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    The only difference I've found from a finish PoV from a bandsaw and a notcher is the natural prep achieved on thick wall tube by the bandsaw. The fitment is as good but you will always get a v prep with a bandsaw.
    This can be seen as a good or bad thing. It's good in the respect that if welded properly full pen welds are easily to achieve on any thickness but it can be bad if you ain't driving the torch well as the tunnel effect can be achieved even easier with a prep which is lack of fusion making a weak joint. Plenty of current to punch through and keep it going will see an awesome joint. Obvious rules apply to keep your hand moving round the tube for your arc length to remain tight.
     
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  13. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Thanks, Richard :thumbup:- that's a very good tip and a great clarification as the practicalities of doing it [for a Numpty like me] :clapping:
     
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  14. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Well for me it's very practical.
    My experience with tube notchers are either very good but expensive and big like the belt type or really hard work and nasty like the cheap hole saw type which don't last five mins with a bit of 3mm wall SS tube on the go. Bear in mind I have been notching with saws for over 5 years and have it down to a tee. It takes a little practice to get those two important cuts bang on. If they are out then you'll have a big gap which is no good. Angled tube notching to off set the tubes takes some working out but like I say once you've got it right once you note it down and it's easy.
    Expanding the use of an already useful tool costs nothing and more importantly for me takes no extra space. It's not an industrial production method by any means but for us earning a bit of cash on a side line it's as good as anything else I think. I started the thread as I was notching some for a modification to a frame and thought it wasn't a covered subject on here and was interested how many others do it.
     
  15. zx9

    zx9 Member

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    Thanks Richard, time to have a play with the bandsaw over the weekend me thinks.
     
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  16. Gritineye Member

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    Sussex UK
    Thanks for posting that Richard, very neat. :thumbup:
     
  17. HughF

    HughF Member

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    One of my favourite fabricator youtube guys doing a video about it, but cutting it with a grinder:



    Apologies Richard for spamming this thread, but I thought it was relevant.
     
  18. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    It's absolutely relevant Hugh.
    I've done them with grinders when I've not had a saw
    He did a nice job of it.
     
  19. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

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    Somerset
    Weve got an old manual cropper thing that notches straight 90 joints, but not much use for angled ones like stair handrails.
    I quite often do the lot on the saw.... but in two cuts. Once youve done a test joint you know how much to knock off the length of the tube, then just cut 2 angles on it just shy of the centre line to leave the flat across the top.
    Pretty much the same as Richard's method, but without the last cut.

    Angled ones generally still need tickling out a bit with a grinder at the sides for a good fit.
     
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  20. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Nice tip there hitch. Like it.
     
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