Autovip 1400 & 1700 Car Tilter Chassis Dolly

  1. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    I bought an Autovip car tilter at the end of last year as I had a job to do that really needed the car on it's side or upside down. A rotisserie would have been my prefered choice but a lack of garage length would have made walking around the car difficult and this Autovip 1700 came up at the right price unused. As I need to tilt the car on both sides more than once per side, this would require unbolting the mounting brackets from the hubs and refitting the wheels to push the car outside and turn it round. This would be very time consuming and I would need someone to help push so I decided to make an adjustable chassis dolly that would attach to the Autovip hub brackets.

    Luckily I had been given some 450kg capacity braked castors as used on scaffold towers that might come in handy one day so I designed the dolly around those using 48.3mm diameter 3mm wall steel tube for the uprights that drop into the castors. The main dolly frame is 50 x 50 x 3mm box section with 100 x 8mm plate cut to 200mm long for the clamping plates. These are drilled for 4 off M10 bolts to give plenty of adjustment catering for any vehicle that will fit the Autovip frame and the whole assembly can be easily disassembled for storage.

    The Autovip frame is held together by six 10mm pins retained with R clips and once removed four of these go through the chassis dolly uprights then the frame is assembled under the car. The frame is very rigid once clamped together and moves relatively easily for an oversized shopping trolley! I can now move the car outside on my own and turning it round is easily achieved by locking a brake on an individual castor.


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    I have just enough room to roll the car fully in my garage, a 1966 Jensen CV8.

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    Adjustable for any vehicle that will fit on the Autovip frame, large......

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    ......or small!

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    Uprights drop into the castors, clamp plate welded to upright.

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    Lower plate has full weld to box section.

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    Each castor braked.

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    Outside for the first time in a while.
     
    stuvy, tom2207, slim_boy_fat and 3 others like this.
  2. bigbadbugga

    bigbadbugga Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    Liverpool uk
    I like that. :)
     
  3. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Thanks, I expect to see Chinese copies for sale on Ebay soon! :laughing:
     
  4. darren.a.roberts Member

    Messages:
    115
    Cambridge
    Very nice work....
     
  5. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Thanks.
     
  6. Ingenious dude. :D
     
  7. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Cheers. :D I was just looking at your VW thread again and realised you might be in a similar situation. My initial idea was to make a kit of parts to add the wheels I had onto the Autovip frame but as it's a bit on the loose and wobbly side decided against it and went for a seperate frame. I Googled "chassis dolly" for inspiration wanting to use the least amount of box section I could get away with for the main framework and still be fully adjustable to fit any vehicle that would go on the Autovip frame. This configuration seemed to be the simplest and as the longest length is just 3.2m of 50 x 50 x 3, I always have a bit in stock available for those last minute projects. :laughing:
     
  8. I would love to have the same set up, however, the tilt frame I have borrowed must be one of the early doors ones as the wheel mounting plates are part and parcel of the frame with a multi-hole fitment. I assume it is just an early design which was improved upon by Autovip. Nice bit of kit you have there.........and get some pics of that stunning car up on here fella.;)

    I'll just be sticking my wheels back on mine when she needs moving over.:D
     
  9. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Is it an Autovip roller? Yours looks like it bolts together, mine slots together using pins and R clips so all the joints are quite loose and scared the life out of me first time I tried rolling the car over!

    The car isn't mine but I will post a few photos of the work I have done at some stage.
     
  10. Mine is just 2 curved beams and a cross beam which ties the both ends together. Quite simple really. I will keep an eye out for an Auto vip though as this VW resto isn't gonna be my last.
     
  11. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    A little addition to the Autovip car roller, needed to remove the front suspension and still roll the car so I fabricated a weld on crossbeam.

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    50 x 50 x 3mm box section with 5mm plate ears at each end.
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    Two 100mm lengths of 50 x 50 x 3mm welded at 90° to the crossbeam then welded directly to the vehicle front crossmember. Being fixed to the car and not the hubs has taken some of the flexibility out of the frame and it feels a lot better rolling the car on it's side as there is less fore and aft movement.
     
  12. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Change of use for the dolly ends, a couple of clamp on brackets and we have a flying bedstead. :)

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    James1979, Superbad and monky harris like this.
  13. Rig Pig

    Rig Pig Member

    Messages:
    3,755
    Location:
    Narrwich! U.K.
    Very handy
     
  14. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Needed to move the car about with only the rear wheels on so made a fixture for my pallet truck. Hole and pin are standard jack diameter so I can also use a trolley jack cup on the pallet truck or the jack on the car pin. Rolls and turns really easily with a dob of grease on the plates and pin but the car needs to be kept at the correct height for the plates to be in full contact. Would have used a 50mm tow ball & hitch but didn't have a spare hitch. Pin could also do with a decent taper to make location a little easier.

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    Exuptoy, James1979, Superbad and 3 others like this.
  15. Superbad Member

    Messages:
    280
    I've just finished building my own custom copy for a Sierra. I've made height adjustable to get onto a rotisserie. I first used pneumatic wheels so they can travel over uneven ground. But the weight was too much. The dolly has rubber wheels on now
     
    stuvy and slim_boy_fat like this.
  16. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    I have just sorted out the cross pieces to repurpose the box section as I am unlikely to need the dolly for a while, I have an Opel Manta that will need to go on a rotisserie so the plates and wheels will go into that build. The Jensen that was on the roller and dolly returned in January for storage before being sold, that's not going to happen any time soon with this lockdown!
     
    Superbad, slim_boy_fat and Exuptoy like this.
  17. Superbad Member

    Messages:
    280
     
    Wallace likes this.
  18. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Brakes on each castor help with manoeuvring on your own as you can lock one and rotate around the castor. I could easily turn the car 180° on my drive and even managed in the narrower back garden. :thumbup:
     
    stuvy and Superbad like this.
  19. Superbad Member

    Messages:
    280
    That's a good point. Your ground must be fairly smooth
     
    stuvy likes this.
  20. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    7,094
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Yes, reasonably good block paving.
     
    Superbad likes this.
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