Air tools running way better since ditching cheap regulator!

  1. rcx132

    rcx132 Philip

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    If you've read my other threads you will know that my MBX surface prep tool went from useless to very useful when I ditched my Sealey air regulator and fitted a decent Metalworks/Devilbiss regulator. And now my other tools are also totally different tools. So it's not just PSI that matters, it's airflow. The Sealey regulator must have been throttling down the airflow.

    Someone just suggested to help further to replace the quick release fittings with ones that don't have the automatic flow stoppers in them. But can't find any. I'm using the high flow Euro type. I was going to put ball valves behind them. Anyone know a brand of euro fittings that don't have the auto shutoff?

    My die grinder now is also working properly and grinds away metal instead of just grinding itself away and costing me a fortune in bits.
     
  2. scottmk1

    scottmk1 Forum Supporter

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    Did you replace it with the same size regulator?
     
  3. rcx132

    rcx132 Philip

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    The sealey one had 1/4" ports. The new Metalworks one has 1/2" ports.
     
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  4. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
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    funny you should mention this, I started playing with my wolf compressor at the weekend. mines a wolf dakota like this (and a few of us on here have them)

    http://www.ukhs.tv/Dakota-14-CFM-Air-Compressor

    someone was posting on here how much better they are with a different regulator

    so wound the regulator fully open and put a standard plc coupling in the output. I then turned the compressor until it switched off (by the pressure switch) and then turned it off at the mains.

    I the put in a generic tail in the coupling and timed how long it took to go down to 50psi, and it took 40 seconds.

    I then removed the regulator and just had the coupling connected to the compressor and it took 20 seconds to go down to 50 psi

    I then started modifying a regulator by increasing the bore and seating face (the only picture I took)

    DSC00202.JPG

    and did the same with this regulator and this one 20 seconds to go down to 50psi.

    I've ordered some PLC XF (euro) fittings to try the same again with and see what a difference it makes and see if its worth me upgrading to the higher flow fittings or not.
     
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  5. rcx132

    rcx132 Philip

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    Awesome! That Wolf compressor is a good price. Same spec as me Sealey but £180 cheaper.

    I added two small 9 cfm DIY compressors to my set up to keep up with sand blasting but I'm suspicious of these DIY compressors. They seem a lot weaker than the industrial 14 CFM Sealey even though there should only be a 30 % difference.
     
  6. hareng Member

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    1,465
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    Same compressor as other branded names, this one had about 3 yrs ago cheaper and with a hose http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BURISCH-A...991789?hash=item25bcb867ed:g:gcsAAOSwAYtWGQOm

    Changed the regulator and stand off from old compressor, but retained the pressure switch.
    Used daily if only for an air line and once a week for 2hrs bead blasting where it does get hot. Gets warm filling two tanks up at same time as well. New pump for old Clark comp was over £220, fairly sure paid £265 delivered for link above and not worth the hassle in down time.
     
  7. ukracer Forum Supporter

    If i have one of these fitted
    Screenshot_20170504-005205.png

    Will that mean i cant use a half inch regulator.?

    I might need a new switch soon.....so its useful to know if i can actually get a half inch pressure control switch.
     
  8. Luke

    Luke Forum Supporter

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    If you look inside that tiny gate valve, you'll see the hole is about 2-3mm, so fitting a 1/2" regulator isn't going to make any difference at all.

    Much better to fit the regulator to the port on the end of the tank, if you've got one.

    The risk is that you can then easily exceed the duty cycle on the pump, so you need to be aware of how long it's running for.
     
  9. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    you'll need a 1/4" to 1/2" adaptor to fit a 1/2 regulator, you need to remove the regulator and check what size the fitting is
     
  10. rcx132

    rcx132 Philip

    Messages:
    1,842
    Location:
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    It depends where your bottle neck is. On my compressor it was the regulator. You would remove the existing regulator. I don't think the regulator port size is what restricts the flow, it is just an indicator of what sort of flow the regulator was designed for.
     
  11. ukracer Forum Supporter

    Surely that is a waste of time....the flow can only be as good as it's smallest bore??
     
  12. Burdekin

    Burdekin Chief Bodger

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    Just bypass the tank regulator and go directly from the end of the tank. Fit a regulator/water trap at the other end of the line.
     
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  13. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
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    Location:
    halifax, England

    Ive recieved the PLC XF fittings now and tried them using the same method.

    with the XF fitting connected directly to the compressor, it took 9 seconds for the pressure to drop to 50psi in the tank, and with the xf fitting and modified regulator fitted it took 14 seconds for the pressure to drop to 50 psi.

    looks like I'll be getting a Clarke CAT865 regulator as they can flow over 100cfm to to attach to the compressor

    https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-cat865-air-regulator-with-gauge/

    and for my desicant dryer, I'll be getting one of the filters to remove moisture going into it

    http://www.solenoid-valve.world/coi...RL-air-preparation-equipment/shako-nuf-filter

    and one of these filter regulators to remove any debris and regulate the air going out of it

    http://www.solenoid-valve.world/coi...aration-equipment/NUFR-shako-filter-regulator

    both of which can flow 70cfm and changing to xf fittings too, like others have recently done. I do like the idea of the automatic drain on the filters when the pressure in the regulator drops to less than 7psi.
     
  14. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    26,969
    Location:
    yarm
    there a bit economical with the flow rates on the fittings.I use 90cfm on blast pot using 3/4 bore hose and open c couplings and half inch ball valves . anything smaller and I can notice the difference in output pressure but they will be fine for everything else
     
  15. carbon

    carbon Member

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    Location:
    S. Glos. U.K
    On the commercial compressors I've had neither had a regulator connection on the pressure switch, it may have been possible to connect one but the inlet to the pressure switch isn't the biggest for high flow rates.
     
  16. Henrik Member

    Random question : my comp only goes up to 8 bar, and my plasma cutter already has a regular that brings the pressure down to a suitable level.

    Would there be any downsides of not running a regulator at all? I'm thinking that most air tools deal with a minimum of 8 bar anyway?
     
  17. carbon

    carbon Member

    Messages:
    1,184
    Location:
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    Depends on the maximum air pressure the rest of your tools are rated for but possibly you would loose an air filter if your regulator has one
     
  18. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    I fitted the new clarke regulator earlier today with an XF coupling an that will drop the pressure in the tank to 50psi from full pressure in 10 seconds.

    the pressure gauge is upside down as I need to make a locknut to hold it in place. and the original regulator is in front of it. think thats a good upgrade for less that £20 with a machinemart voucher.


    DSC00216.JPG

    and luckily for me the top of the new regulator is held on with 4 screws, so it can be unscrewed to fit the regulator body to the pressure switch. I was originally going to remove the pressure switch to fit the regulator but that would have been more complicated as I'd need to unwire the electrics too.

    I'm going now......thread hijack over :whistle::whistle:
     
  19. Cobbler

    Cobbler Codger bodger

    Messages:
    4,407
    Location:
    Gloucestershire UK
    I always run my rattle gun & mini cutter straight off the tank, just give them a shot of oil before & after use, I also have an air chisel that I rarely use, that I may or not use through a reg, as at full pressure it goes wild, I use the reg if required to throttle it down a bit. They are brilliant at taking of wall tiles by the way, just cut the pressure down or else it will take everything off, plaster, blocks you name it.
     
  20. carbon

    carbon Member

    Messages:
    1,184
    Location:
    S. Glos. U.K
    If you used an adapter between the pressure switch and the regulator 1/4" - 1/2" you may get more flow by fitting the regulator to the end of the tank, if the tank has a 1/2" blank fitted. One of the downsides of changing this is the regulator is then exposed on the end of the compressor and more prone to accidental damage
     
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