Advice for metal thickness and settings please

  1. Paulpen Member

    Hi guys

    Ive some welding to do on the rear lower quarter panels on my Landcruiser (its behind the rear bumper but id still like to make it neat ! ).

    Ive access to a welder from a friend which I think is a Sealey 180A

    Ive got to get some metal so what gauge / thickness should I be after for 20 year old Japanese bodywork and any idea on setting I should be using (power and speed) as ive not dont welding in years let alone on this machine !
     
  2. grim_d

    grim_d Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,058
    Location:
    Scotland - Ayrshire
    Just a pure guess but it's probably 1.0mm or thinner, though I appreciate that landcruisers are significantly more robust than your average Japanese grocery getter so I may be way off.

    Power comes down to what the welder is capable of, about 30amps is the maximum that you can do that thickness of steel and is the likely minimum of an 180amp machine, you just fine tune the speed at the time.

    You will more than likely need to employ the "thin metal technique" which is detailed in the how to weld section on here, which is basically running a series of tacks to minimise heat in the panel and mitigate distortion and blow through. It can actually look super neat when done properly.

    Do a bit of practicing first!
     
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  3. Paulpen Member

    I dont think the bodywork is thicker than the usual type of the age I just dont have a way of measuring what is there currently.

    I guess it all comes down to if I should be trying to match whats there already or aiming for a set thickness ?

    Some research on the welder shows that minimum is 30A as you said and advises that voltage step 1 (which I assume is 30A) uses wire speed 5 as a guide it also has spot weld timer 6 but I have no idea what a spot weld timer does or if i need it ?

    Ill have a read on the thin metal technique now :)
     
  4. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

    Messages:
    215
    Location:
    Southampton
    I'm about to do a similar repair in the same area on my Surf, and I'm using 0.9mm sheet. Just waiting for a slight improvement in the outside temps, and then I'll make a start. I've practiced on some offcuts using the "thin metal technique" as suggested by grim_d and it's doesn't take long to get dialled in. I've a Sealey too, and used Min 1 and played with the wire speed :thumbup:
     
  5. Paulpen Member

    I had a Surf a while ago and wish id kept it in all honesty !

    What Sealey model do you have Nick as I may try and get somethink I own for future work as I never like borrowing ideally !
     
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  6. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

    Messages:
    215
    Location:
    Southampton
    I have the Sealey Supermig 150 which is capable of doing what I want as a novice. I know that Sealey are frowned upon by some, but in the relatively short time I've had mine, I've had no problems with it and have learned a lot.

    Love my Surf and had this one for over 15 years - this was offroad down in the Algarve last October :thumbup: IMG_3280a.jpg
     
  7. Paulpen Member

    Looks like a tidy one and thats impressive as there cant be many left now !

    Ive never been able to fault other Sealey stuff in the hobby range - if you are wleding all day then its not going to cut it but for the odd bit there and there....
     
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  8. Nick DV

    Nick DV Member

    Messages:
    215
    Location:
    Southampton
    Thanks :thumbup: There are still quite a few out there, but unfortunately loads are being broken :vsad: I think the S/M 150 is pretty good for the money - but that's only IMHO of course ;)
     
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