A Day In the Life

  1. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    UK
    An alarm call was sent to me as I am currently starting at 4am and after arriving at work I found the culprit, a bat, I didn't ask if his name was fruit, ding, or even acro; caught him and let him out.

    Yesterday was an interesting day as I am booked to go to a regular client who builds specialised trailers for the next four days as his son normally works with him, but had decided he could take his motorhome out and has gone supposedly for a month, so I checked the job sheet. There was a note saying his Esab welder was playing up and could I take a spare for him as it is all sequence welding, so it was loaded up with several spools of 1mm wire.

    My normal duties resumed and the large CNC plasma was checked and the jobs weren't nested so it was check the cables time and a comms cable had been removed and not reconnected properly and a quick tightening of the screw collar fixed it and it began nesting the drawings, ready for firing up. I checked the jobs and noted the plate thicknesses and duly loaded up its auto feeder with the correct thickness plates for its self loading mechanism and hit the start button and off it went. I went to our fuel pump and fueled up the truck and its internal fuel tanks and it was a case of waiting for our plasma guy starting at 5am so I could get off. While waiting I loaded up the pallet of CNC cut plates for my job as he always uses us for cutting his brackets for his trailers.

    Our plasma man arrived and I went to site and the clients wife was waiting for me and gave me her customary hug and went to make my coffee, bless, I have her trained, and I backed the lorry into his workshop and unloaded the spare Esab and my Oerlikon and put a spool of 1mm wire on the Esab and a 1mm contact tip as he had the first chassis set up in the jig, one I built years ago.
    With every joint checked we began welding and as I work quicker than him I had to keep stopping to let him catch up, and all the welds on the side were completed and we turned the jig over and welded the other side and the chassis was left in the jig to cool His wife appeared and shouted "bacon, bacon and egg, and what bread do you want it on" as she always makes our breakfast and she appeared with her home cured bacon and self produced egg sandwich for us; she is good isn't she.

    When the chassis cooled the brackets were installed and tacked on, after alignment they were fully welded and the chassis was removed from the jig while he loaded it with the second chassis sections for welding and we welded that together and while it was cooling he got a call. I tacked the brackets on and he returned with the phone and said it was one of the Directors asking if I could rag up and go to another emergency job and leave the Esab welder with the client, I took a couple of spools of wire from the truck and loaded the Oerlikon back onto the truck.

    I got to the emergency job and found it was a construction site and the balconies we made didn't fit and the outer support posts were to short, but all the internal steelwork was fine; after looking at the site drawings it showed their concrete levels were about 15" to low and someone from the construction company were going to get their nads chewed for such a schoolboy error. After measuring up I asked our drawing office to look up the original specifications and roll me two steel rings to fit just inside the pipe and to send me two pieces of pipe and two footplates and I would weld them on site.
    meanwhile the site Manager was asked of he had 20mm threaded bar and fast curing resin and he had, it was 5 minute curing resin. I got the Rotabroach out and a bit while the site labourers packed the bottom balcony as the side tube supports would hold the rest up.

    My materials arrived and I checked them for fit and quickly welded the new bases to the tubular support and slid the new ring inside the original tubular support to check for fit and it was fine, so a quick marking and I broached holes in the original support for plug welding and the same on the extension tube. I marked the split ring in the centre and slid it into the original support and slid the new extension under it and packed it up, I tapped the original support and the ring came down gently until I could see the centre mark and it was tacked to the extension tube, the tube was wedged to set the root gap and then tacked to the original support tube and the holes were plug welded.

    With everything set the tubes were welded at high power as the site guys drilled 24mm holes while I cut the 20mm bar into lengths and they injected the resin into the holes and the threaded bar was inserted, after 10 minutes it was hard and I knocked steel wedges under the base so they could remove the wood packing and I inserted some steel shim plates.
    We got the site joiner to make some basic boxes to fit around the new feet and we mixed up some resin grout and poured it in and it will be left overnight to cure and their job today is tighten the nuts and remove the wooden boxes, then it cam be painted and filled with concrete to THE CORRECT LEVEL.
     
  2. frank horton

    frank horton V twins are great but 4"s rule.........

    Messages:
    1,844
    Location:
    Soon 2 B Crete
    "oh what a day."........wait til ur retired.......it don't stop then either........
    never been so busy.......hahaha......
    glad u enjoy ur work........
     
    metalmelt, steve t and Mr Roo like this.
  3. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    I thought that was a thing of the past, with CV rampant? :whistle: :laughing:

    I'd have been very wary of that one...:D. (sorry, coat > door :ashamed:)
     
    Cobbler and daleyd like this.
  4. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    UK
    Slim read the post again, we (being more that 1) were sequence welding, you cannot distance while doing this and I was wearing full protection as was the client, if I wasn't wearing it she would have stayed away from me.

    All but the very high tech egg producers have human handling procedures during their production so there is no difference between her eggs and most you buy from the supermarket.
     
  5. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    I have and you didn't make that clear. :vsad:

    As for the 'eggs' comment, that was a tongue in cheek allusion to eggs of another kind - which I thought you'd pick up on from my in post apology :rolleyes:

    Aaaanyway, moving on.....:)
     
    Anguz, daleyd, Mikes and 4 others like this.
  6. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    8,508
    Location:
    Essex
    What a variety of jobs. Where do you work if you don’t mind my asking?
     
    daleyd likes this.
  7. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Brad, dont give that kind of personal information out on a forum.

    Suffice to say we do general fabrication in the shop which ranges from structural to architectural and anything inbetween, general site welding and contract services along with sub contract services.
    Currently in the workshop are a large loading conveyor and weighing assembly for loading minerals such as sand, ballast, stone, slate, etc, into 1 tonne bags for trade and retail sales to a regular customer.
    Set of balconies for a residential development with architectural infill panels.
    Several machine buckets for hard facing.
    Bridge support columns for a road bridge upgrade to be cast in concrete.
    Sets of stainless pipe bends for a petrochem customer.

    Variety is what I enjoy and having a good employer helps considerably as you could be working to drawings manufacturing sub components or out on a multitude of sites erecting or repairing/modifying.
     
  8. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    UK
    Sorry Slim its early morning and brain like a car engine in limp mode, doesnt't come out of limp mode until 2 cups of caffeine have passed my lips.
     
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