737 Max8. Safe or not safe?

  1. mart

    mart Member

  2. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    I see Mr :padlock: on the horizon. Impossible to separate the politics in this one......:rolleyes:
     
    The_Yellow_Ardvark, Parm and Wozzaaah like this.
  3. mart

    mart Member

    Do you have an opinion on this aircraft Slim?
     
  4. johnik

    johnik Member

    Messages:
    382
    Location:
    sunny Somerset
    from what i have read on a proper pilot,s web site, the problem was a faulty angle of attack sensor, the sensor thought the plane was climbing too steeply and into a stall so it put the nose down, pilot tries to pull nose up, computer says no and heads downwards again, there is a switch to turn that function off but pilots were not told of this switch.
    would i fly in one ?, yup :scared:
     
    rtcosic, mart and brightspark like this.
  5. mart

    mart Member

    A switch to turn it off?
    With earlier models of aircraft I wonder if that sort of thing would be sitched off as soon as the auto-pilot was disengaged
     
  6. mart

    mart Member

    Are you Japanese? :)
     
    Keith 66 and Rig Pig like this.
  7. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    2,975
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Hi, Pilots should know better than speculating (gossiping) about the cause, we will have to wait for the accident investigation findings. Yes I know it's frustrating.

    Colin
     
    slim_boy_fat and brightspark like this.
  8. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Not on the aircraft per se, but if I voiced my opinion as to why America hasn't implemented the ban as other countries have [and it was you who raised the matter]
    , this thread would be :padlock: faster than a fast thing going fast.
     
    stuvy, More Amps and indy4x like this.
  9. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Metal mangler

    Messages:
    4,219
    Location:
    Bolton, England
    I disagree, as with any industrial accident, specialists within that trade will speculate as to the cause, and generally be right.


    As for the grounding, I would imagine that is common practice after several crashes of the same aircraft in similar circumstances. It’s worth noting though that the aircraft that have gone in have been operated by countries that are not traditionally viewed as having particularly stringent safety and training regimes
     
    Brad93, lshigham, mart and 3 others like this.
  10. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,026
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    It's put me off buying one. I think i'll stick with my square windowed DH Comet.
     
    Browser, Stueeee, stuvy and 13 others like this.
  11. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    2,975
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Hi, Oh yes you're right to an extent, A pilot would have an understanding of what could be wrong but a flight engineer would have a better one because they have more technical training than the pilot. What I was meaning was that the mainstream media are in an information vacuum about what the cause is and will be searching for something to report and pilots on a forum should not be aiding that with what could be unguarded comments.

    Colin
     
    stuvy likes this.
  12. johnik

    johnik Member

    Messages:
    382
    Location:
    sunny Somerset
    doubt autopilot would be on at that moment in time and the AOA sensor is just another feature that should make the plane safer, but when the computer makes a bad decision and the pilot cant override it....then you have a problem, i have flown a 70,s cessna with rattling doors so fear means nothing to me :whistle:
     
    stuvy and slim_boy_fat like this.
  13. voipio Member

    Messages:
    614
    Cambridge, UK
    There was a report on the radio of an eyewitness apparently seeing the aircraft struggling, making a "funny" noise, with one of the engines on fire, which does not square with an angle of attack sensor problem. Not heard or seen that statement repeated, though, so it might be spurious.
     
  14. mike os

    mike os just a little insane.....

    Messages:
    5,601
    Location:
    North Wales
    There certainly appears to be an issue with 2 going down recently. .. could be totally unrelated issues, pilot error, etc .

    Pointless speculating, grounding them is usually what happens in these circumstances as no one wants to be in the firing line if another does it.

    Given boing's record ... it would be unfair to point too hard at a fatal design flaw at this time, but I would prefer a differrnt plane right now
     
  15. p0689109 Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    Location:
    stoke on trent,england
    When the A320 was first introduced you might remember the one that "landed" in a forest at the end of a short runway where it was being displayed by one of the test crew. Being nearly all new technology at the time the crew did not realise that the electronics was not programmed for this sort of display routine and so continued to land! Another instance occurred when Air India lost one as their crews again were confused with how the auto pilot worked and flew it into the ground. I thought that the airline world would have learnt lessons from that and ensured that the flight crews of all nationalities were trained to a industry standard but it seems that might not be the case. So best to wait and see if its people error as in operational or indeed the makers of the aircraft who are at fault. Clearly USA think its the former!
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe and johnik like this.
  16. Tom O Member

    Messages:
    112
    Location:
    Canada
    Both Canada and the USA have grounded these planes it was announced this morning due to new info.
     
    slim_boy_fat and ronan like this.
  17. ronan

    ronan Member

    Messages:
    8,184
    dublin
    I am sure the plane was scrutinised and tested at every step of design, and manufacture, to within an inch of its life. There maybe a problem, but i am sure there it will be found very quickly and rectified.
     
  18. Burdekin

    Burdekin Chief Bodger

    Messages:
    4,395
    Location:
    Aberdeen
    US just anounced they will stop flying them as well which is the correct decision until they know what caused both accidents and if there is an inherent fault.
     
    roofman likes this.
  19. knighty Member

    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    Sunderland
    I heard some kind of air crash investigator being interviewed on radio 4 a couple of days ago, he was very careful to say it's too soon to say for sure, we're just speculation etc.

    but he said the same as posted above, there's 2 angle sensors to stop the plane going into a stall nose up which could have pulled the nose down... that fit with radar etc. which showed it going up/down faster that it should have, and also fits with the previously crashed done

    he also said it's odd that there's only 2 sensors because an faulty reading could cause something like this... there's normally at least 3 sensors so if the computer gets one odd reading it ignores it and sticks with the other two

    the system is new compared to the smaller plane (normal 737 vs 737max) when they made the plane bigger they had to add it (I'm not sure if he didn't say why or I just forgot) also said the crews were not trained with these new systems, hot to turn it off etc.
     
    stuvy and johnik like this.
  20. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

    Messages:
    6,037
    Location:
    North West
    Ethiopian airlines have one of the safest history's in relation to accidents
     
    Tinbasherdan and bwservices like this.
Advertisements