3D MIG printing....

  1. Crouchy121

    Crouchy121 New Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    England Worthing
    Well this is a sign of things to come. What are you thoughts? I saw something like this a couple of years ago but it was print welding some weird object.

     
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  2. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

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    Stockton on Tees, UK
    I observed for the first time a 3D printer in action the other day.
    It was just one of the cheaper type using plastic filament. As I watched it, the thought came to me how like mig welding the filament coming out was & wondered if you could link a mig welder to a 3D printing rig. Your video shows that its perfectly feasible.
    RonA
     
  3. garethp Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    816
    sw scotland
    I cant figure out how to do a link to a YouTube video on my phone but if you do a search for 3d welded propeller there are some vid's of what looks to be a bronze propeller being made for a tug boat.
     
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  4. Moose McAlpine

    Moose McAlpine Member

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    359
    Location:
    Watford Hertfordshire
    How about a 3D printed bridge?

    bridge-project.jpg 6.-MX3D-Printed-Bridge-at-DDW-by-Adriaan-de-Groot.jpg
     
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  5. fizzy Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,369
    uk



    Quality not great.
    Most of the new systems use sintered metal - a powder melted by a laser.
     
  6. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Not as good as @selectedgrub's offerings. :vsad:
     
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  7. selectedgrub

    selectedgrub Member

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    877
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    New Zealand
    My software is so out dated :laughing:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. JLP

    JLP Member

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    163
    Location:
    Beds - UK
    I used to do this for a living, at Cranfield University, but with MIG (It's actually done with CMT, but same principal) and plasma on the Ti parts. Worked on some pretty awesome projects with the likes of Airbus, BAE, Bombardier, Lockheed, etc. Making A320 wing pylons was my last bit there, awesome work but does get a bit boring when its all set up right.

    Check this one out from autodesk, they started this back when it was still delcam and making the A320 pylons was part of the development process of the software they now use.
    [​IMG]

    Also made the (at the time) worlds largest 3D printed part, an aluminium wing spar
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. JLP

    JLP Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    Beds - UK
    That's Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing, the walls are typically much smoother in the laser applications but they do have their draw backs too such as strength and time to produce. The parts are typically machined after deposition with WAAM, not so much with laser powder bed
     
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  10. Tinbasherdan

    Tinbasherdan Bodger in chief

    Messages:
    4,425
    Location:
    Bolton, England
    Watched a video on damen tugs “printing” a tug prop , that was hellishly impressive
     
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  11. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    6,550
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    Don't ask questions
    I'm always impressed by the fine detail that can be printed, this is a chain tensioner pulley made by CermaicSpeed for cyclists with more money than sense.
    Pulley.jpg
    It's actually made to show off what's possible with the technology though you really can buy it of you're so inclined. The whole thing has about a 1mm cavity inside it, it would be more or less impossible to produce with conventional subtractive machining methods. I believe it's used in medicine too to recreate damaged/missing pieces of bone. This is of course SLS not WAAM.
     
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  12. JLP

    JLP Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    Beds - UK
    Autodesk also did this one, believe it was for a tug
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. DAPPH

    DAPPH Member

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    1,650
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    Near to Cross Hands Llanelli SouthWales GB
    I wonder ….. you could built the frame for a space station , actually build it on the moon or in outer space as transporting reels of wire must be cheaper than the volume of space taken up by tubes etc . As the volume taken up by reels of material & robots would eventually be far less volume than the earth made tubes & spars or should I keep my feet firmly on the ground?
    Can you weld in a very cold partial vacuum is the question I suppose ought to be asked first?
     
  14. armalites Member

    Messages:
    3,775
    Herefordshire
    I was chatting with a BAE guy at Fairford air show a couple of years back they were talking about printing titanium even then. They could print enclosed parts that would not be possible in normal manufacturing.
     
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  15. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

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    Location:
    Stockton on Tees, UK
    If the inert gas in mig welding is to keep out oxygen, would have thought a vacuum would be great to weld in, no shielding gas req'd.
    RonA
     
  16. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    6,160
    Location:
    Rotherham
    Electron Beam Welding is done under vacuum but Ive never heard of MIG
     
  17. Moose McAlpine

    Moose McAlpine Member

    Messages:
    359
    Location:
    Watford Hertfordshire
    A friend of mine works in motorsport as an "additive manufacturing specialist" where they do all sorts of 3D printing. He says at his work they print the Renault F1 gearboxes from titanium.
     
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  18. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    When you (arc) weld in at atmosphere, the gas (Inert or not) is ionised and becomes conductive. As the pressure is reduced, approaching a perfect vacuum, the breakdown voltage increases so it's harder to ionise and form an arc, I don't think you'd get arc welding to work in space.

    The limiting factor with getting things into space is the weight anyway, a bigger rocket can be built to carry a bigger (Greater volume) satellite without a huge penalty but a heavier satellite needs a rocket with bigger engines, carrying much more fuel (And the increased weight of the fuel requires even more fuel to carry it, that's why most rockets are multistage and drop their heavy fuel tanks when they empty). The equipment and materials to manufacture a space craft would be an awful lot heavier than a space craft already manufactured on earth.
     
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  19. Ali

    Ali Member

    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Thisoldtony has had a crack at it:

     
  20. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

    Messages:
    1,296
    Location:
    Stockton on Tees, UK
    This makes for interesting reading.
    https://www.weldingschool.com/blog/welding/history-of-welding-in-space/
    RonA
     
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