18v Impact Wrench

  1. SierraV6 Member

    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    North East England
    I’m thinking of investing in either a Bosch GDS 250 or Makita DTW285Z, mainly for automotive use at home. I already have tools from both systems (yes I know....) and they are available at the same price so it really comes down to which one is ‘better’. The Makita is a bit more torquey on paper but does anybody have real life experience? I can’t find a head to head review anywhere which is surprising really.

    I’ve not used impact wrenches that much in the past, even when HGV fitting, as my mentor was old school and didn’t like them. To be fair I’ve seen the result of their misuse as I’m sure we all have.... I don’t expect the world from either of the above, but it would be nice to save a bit of time when removing wheel nuts, subframe bolts, that kind of thing.

    Cheers guys.
     
  2. armalites Member

    Messages:
    4,030
    Herefordshire
    This thread will no doubt spark a which is best debate but the reality is buying the a unit that fits the batteries and chargers you already have will always be a good way to go. I would say it doesn't really matter too much way you but I would go with the brand that you have the most batteries for, that way you can leave one on the tool. It's probably more likely you'll find discount deals on Makita batteries than Bosch so that's a consideration

    My kit is Dewalt so I have a Dewalt impact. Many of the numbers quoted are nothing more than pub numbers but I'll get a rough idea.
     
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  3. excossack Member

    Messages:
    559
    Location:
    North West
    I have a Makita DTW285 and happy with it. A few bolts its struggled with i.e the 30odd MM nut for the radius arms on the 110. (but to be fair, I struggled with a long bar on it). I also have the Makita drill as well so same batteries/charger.
     
  4. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
    6,815
    Location:
    Don't ask questions
    Base it on tools you're likely to get in the future too if you're likely to get more. I'd get the Makita as the batteries will fit, say, a cordless ratchet that Bosch don't even make.
     
  5. SierraV6 Member

    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    North East England
    Some good points, thanks. Actually, what I hadn’t considered was the size of the batteries I already have. I don’t have anything bigger that 2ah from Bosch whereas I have a 4ah Makita battery that the GF usually commandeers for the hedge trimmer :laughing:. I imagine the bigger battery will give noticeably better results on an impact wrench?
     
  6. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
    6,815
    Location:
    Don't ask questions
    I don't think the battery capacity has much effect on the output of the tool but an impact is usually fairly heavy and rarely used overhead, at arms length or anything so a big heavy battery on it doesn't make a massive difference whereas something like a drill is nice to keep it light with a small battery. On the other hand, an impact probably gets ninety percent of it's use in a workshop where a battery can be easily swapped and charged so short battery life isn't a huge problem either.
     
  7. armalites Member

    Messages:
    4,030
    Herefordshire
    In theory the bigger batteries should just give better run time but I've seen a couple of tests on youtube where bigger AH batteries gave better performance. With Li-Ion it's not always the case that the number of cells is simply a derivative of the voltage like it was with Ni-cad or Ni-Mh. So it's likely with a higher amperage battery the tool has access to more cells. That's how things like Flexvolt work.
     
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  8. Proposition Joe

    Proposition Joe Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    Suffolk
    Very compact & light, mostly used by scaffolders but alright on cars. The forward reverse detent switch is very light like most new makita's & can knocked to the wrong position way too easy.
     
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  9. Cyberprog Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    Wotton-Under-Edge (Near Bristol)
    I have a bosch 18V Impact, it's one of the older ni-cad ones but the batteries are still good as I've had it from new (just checked and I registered the warranty in 2008!).

    If I were buying now, I'd look at the milwake fuel range. The 18V hasn't got the guts to break the wheel nuts on my landie, I often have to use the breaker bar. These are torqued to 140Nm.
     
  10. Cyberprog Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    Wotton-Under-Edge (Near Bristol)
    Worth also saying though I have a Gen1 Bosch GDS10.8V-LI and it's one of the best tools I ever bought, around the same sort of time.
     
  11. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    5,917
    Location:
    Essex
    Makita over Bosch
     
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  12. Proposition Joe

    Proposition Joe Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    Suffolk
    And if you are a Gambler/Skint this ChiCom copy is available for a third of the price.
     
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  13. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,351
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    I use the Makita one every day. Its good but do not believe what the blurb says, It will not break a 400nm nut. Depends on what you want it to do. Great for smaller nuts and bolts but would not loosen most larger wheel nuts from tight. Crack 'em off with a bar and wizz off with the gun.
    I wouldn't be without mine, but just be aware of its limitations.

    @Maker, that ratchet is 12v. I wish they did a 18v one!
     
  14. eddie49 Member

    Yes, it will.
    The "larger" batteries ( such as 6AH or 9AH ) get their higher capacity by placing cells in parallel.
    For 18v you need 5 x 18650 lithium-ion cells in series. The cells used today in professional cordless tools are 3AH, so a 6AH pack will have two of these 5-strings in parallel. The cells are joined into parallel pairs ( or triples for 9AH ) with spot-welded nickel strips before these pairs are then joined in series. Depending on the brand, each cell can safely deliver a current of 10 or 20 times it's rated capacity.
    So a 3AH cell rated at "10C" can send 30 Amps to the motor. Putting two of these cells in parallel, in a 6AH battery, doubles the current-supply capability, as well as the run-time capacity.
     
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  15. minimutly Member

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire Wales
    There you go - "mechanics/ fitters/ engineers" talking about amphours, cells in parallel, mixed in with torque...
    IKB would turn in his grave, but it really is a sign of the times.
    This morning I watched a tesla saloon beat a l 600bhp lambo in a 0 to 60 drag race. The tesla won by a nig margin.
    I shant be spending £30k of my banks money on it for a few years...
     
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  16. Agrismith Member

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Uk south east
    I think I have used both I have definitely used the Makita and I used the Bosch one that has a hole in the anvil for a screwdriver bit
    The Makita is alot more powerful and felt alot more solid I thought the Bosch felt about fisher price tbh
    The makita will do some impressive bolts up and is very good for structural steelwork and with an adapter will happily be used for putting in screws but you have to have a decent adapter and bits the DeWalt adapter lasted days before falling apart Milwaukee has lasted really well but starting to wear
     
  17. chris pruteanu Member

    Messages:
    717
    Location:
    ROMANIA
    Milwaukee onekey 18v- i have older and also new model... the new model is a lot, lot stronger than the old one ! It did undo crank bolts on bmw's, wheel nuts as tight as i can get them with a 1m long breaker bar and axle nuts/wheel bearing nuts on renault masters without a problem ! Trully is a professional tool, try it if you can !
     
  18. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    501
    Location:
    Leeds
    I would suggest Milwaukee too but since you’ve already got an investment in Makita then go that route over Bosch. The compact torque guns that Proposition Joe are great to use. I have the Milwaukee M12 SubCompact rated 340nm and being so small it gets more use than the big M18 one key because it can get into places the big one can’t with the power to remove them. In theory the compact should have power to remove anything on the car but you need a lot more torque to remove wheel bolts, drive shaft nuts etc that haven’t been removed in a long time if at all. The big Milwaukee has never failed yet but nowhere near as useful as the smaller one.
    If the Makita also has automatic speed control, multiple speeds and auto shut off they’re useful functions too.
     
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