Wood burner fuel

  1. jordan1 Member

    Messages:
    1,551
    Location:
    Yorkshire England
    I don't have one myself but cut up what I have for an old lass up the road. She has been told only to burn clean wood, nothing painted or laminates. I was going to cut up our old kitchen units, painted skirting , architraves etc., but she was afraid it would harm her new burner. It all got skipped, shame really as logs she buys are expensive.
     
  2. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    5,054
    Location:
    Kent
    I put everything in mine from the house renovations floor boards door frames skirting stud work
     
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  3. steviec_lj

    steviec_lj Member

    Messages:
    1,461
    Location:
    Barnetby, N.Lincs
    Burn anything and everything, from ply to mdf, chipboard, logs, coal, etc.

    Some tanalised can give off Arsenic, but the fumes should be going up the chimney/flue not into the room.

    I’ve heard of people being told not to burn pallet wood(sticks) and pallet corners because of metal fragments from nails.. Never had a problem, other than burning through 2 grates in 5 years - but it’s in use daily come rain, shine or heatwave
     
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  4. Migmac

    Migmac Member

    Messages:
    2,204
    Location:
    Kintyre. Scotland
    If it’s dry and will burn it’s goes in ours
     
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  5. frank horton

    frank horton V twins are great but 4"s rule.........

    Messages:
    549
    Location:
    manchester, UK
    same here, burn everything, mix it up with oak .... the wood boiler with no glass in the door heats the whole house and the water.....our place is toasty, 6 bed two living rooms etc about 8-10 cube, oak per year bought in plus the rubbish.....much cheaper than oil......
    just sift out the nails before dumping the ash.....
    never put Chestnut in a glass fronted stove......ask me how I know.....
     
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  6. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    How do you know?

    Edit: Actually that's a genuine question, not a smart-Alex reply......:)
     
  7. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    3,044
    Location:
    devon, uk
    You can safely burn many things if you burn them hot enough, but burning chipboard on a smoulder is antisocial if anyone lives within sniffing distance.

    A farm near here seems to go through phases of burning that kind of stuff for weeks on end. Whole village stinks of it if the wind is going the wrong way. Its probably on a bonfire, so will never get proper combustion.

    Again, no issue if you get it well beyond the point where the nasties auto-ignite.
     
  8. Migmac

    Migmac Member

    Messages:
    2,204
    Location:
    Kintyre. Scotland
    I know it spits a lot but that shouldn’t burst the glass, surely
     
  9. reb78 Member

    Messages:
    278
    Herts UK
    Agree with the others. Everything goes on ours in the winter. Just make sure to keep the flue clean and dont let the tar and soot build up - shouldn't be too bad if the fires burn hot enough as pointed out by some of the others.
     
  10. HughF

    HughF Member

    Messages:
    4,432
    Location:
    Work: Dorchester, Workshop: Corfe Castle, Wife's place: Frome
    We ran our Rayburn on kitchen worktops for 5-6 years, hot, dry, easily cut to size and stacked in the firebox.

    If it's dry, it gets burnt...
     
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  11. stalwart_hmlc

    stalwart_hmlc Member

    Messages:
    2,731
    east sussex
    Its not what ya burn,its how you burn it:thumbup:
     
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  12. BarrieJ Member

    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    Milton Keynes, Bucks, United Kingdom
    Same here, everything goes in ours, we mostly burn coal but frequently supplement with, or in early spring, late autumn burn wood, mdf, chipboard, pallets, decking boards etc., etc. Chipboard burns really well with enough draft.
     
  13. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    23,018
    Location:
    yarm
    you wont be for long when the government alters the law on them
     
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  14. doubleboost

    doubleboost Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,093
    Location:
    North Easr England
    How will they enforce it
     
  15. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    23,018
    Location:
    yarm
    someone will grass u up and complain .me bruv got a visit from the environment some prick complained about his stove but nothing happened about it :vsad:cant say anymore but have a good idea who it was
     
  16. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    from an earlier topic

    http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/burning-painted-wood-in-log-burner.78683/

    as goes for myself I have a wood burner a rocket stove it gives off a sweet smell compared to a normal wood stove however the ones with secondary burn burn much better

    be very careful with woodburners nuisance smell and smoke

    im referencing to this one but most councils are the same

    https://www.staffordbc.gov.uk/nuisance-wood-burning-stoves-and-open-fires

    if anyone has a bee in there bonnet about your wood burner giving off bad fumes or smoke you dont want enviromental health involved and if your burning wood from off the property its called collecting waste material to burn

    you need a license for this

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/waste-exemption-u4-burning-of-waste-as-a-fuel-in-a-small-appliance

    a help file reference from defra

    https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/...1010_open_fires_wood_burning_stoves_FINAL.pdf
     
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  17. HughF

    HughF Member

    Messages:
    4,432
    Location:
    Work: Dorchester, Workshop: Corfe Castle, Wife's place: Frome
    To be honest, they're horrible things. We have ours of neccessity rather than a lifestyle choice... If they were all banned I wouldn't be too bothered.
     
  18. gaz1

    gaz1 Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    personally i like a wood stove even with a chest problem, i love seeing the flames dancing and flickering all around the wood burning away in either fast or slow burn

    what i dont like is having to taste or breath someone elses bad burning of wood

    caused by people who refuse to listen to good advice or believe they can do as they please like in the old days

    this includes people who think they can burn garden waste at any time of the day

    ive seen pitch black smoke from a neighbours chimney pouring out

    the smell is acrid and makes your throat feel like its clogging up whilst you cough your lungs out while outside you would think your in the fresh air and thats while theres no smoke from there chimney
    however its on a fast burn as little embers are exiting there chimney

    his wood is soaked, he burns collected wood from all over the place stained/painted mdf chipboard anything he can burn in it

    the first pic all that wood was left out in the snow rain it stayed like this until he needed to cut it up and burnt it straight away

    the second pic is a stained collected waste oily pallet and also a stained fireplace that also got cut up and burnt

    the white clean pallets are still there past all the bad weather and hasnt been cut up or even dried out yet

    20151022_154438.jpg 20180316_160322.jpg
     
  19. One tip I've learnt to help stop the glass tarring up on a wood burning stove is not to have the cut end of a log pointing towards the glass.
    It's simple when you think about it, the log heats up and any residual moisture and sap trapped in the log follows the grain and escapes from the end, if it's pointing at the glass it will tar it up.
     
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  20. MattF

    MattF Member

    Messages:
    8,534
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    I'd rather have a coal or wood burner than a gas/electric boiler.
     
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