Parweld or R-tech

  1. muddydisco Member

    Messages:
    44
    staffordshire
    Hello

    I’m looking at getting myself a ac/dc tig. Just wondering what people recommend?

    Seen the following
    Parweld XTT 202 or 200 amp Rtech

    Thanks
     
  2. Haggis New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Isle of Man
    I’ve got an Rtech tig 161. Had very good service from them and the welders far better than me.
     
  3. muddydisco Member

    Messages:
    44
    staffordshire
    What kind of stuff do you do with it ?
     
  4. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    13,095
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Depends which rtech?
    The parweld is a lot nicer than the anologe 200 rtech but the newer digital 210 is quite an impressive unit and it would be difficult to say which is best.
    The 210 is expensive though so the parweld would probably still get my vote but only because of the price. These middle weight contenders are simply excellent nowadays for such a low cost.
     
  5. muddydisco Member

    Messages:
    44
    staffordshire
    ive got a budget of £1500
     
  6. Haggis New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Isle of Man
    Got it to learn tig with. Doing mostly 2mm alloy sheet. It comes with a wp26 torch and I added a wp9 which is great for thinner stuff and tight corners. They also come with a foot pedal which makes it easier to use, but also makes you a bit lazy with the setup. I try to set the welder so I can weld with the pedal floored so I can learn what amps I really need to weld with.
    I’m sure there are plenty here that will give you better advice than me.
     
  7. Gizmo.Y Member

    Messages:
    727
    Skegness
    Having just had the same dilema.

    I bought the XTT202P, returned it and got the R-TECH 210 Digitial.

    and i would honestly suggest spend the extra and get the R-Tech.
     
    ukracer likes this.
  8. Barlidge

    Barlidge Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    433
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, UK
    Was there any particular reason? the parweld was on my shortlist for sometime in the future.
     
  9. Ian James Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    South west scotland
    I bought a RTec 161 just over a month ago as my Lerner tig and to be honest I get on quite well with it and am pleased with my purchase I find them good to deal with to be honest but have spent a fair bit with them recently
     
  10. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    13,095
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    He didn’t like the pedal set up arrangement. With the pedal plugged in you cannot see what amps your setting. Don’t let it put you off. I’ve used them many times and if I had a grand to spend on one It would be in the short list. Arc and performance wise it’s every bit as good as those new Rtechs.
     
    Barlidge likes this.
  11. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    13,095
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Seriously consider the Gys 207. I’ve used this too and for £1500 it’s better than the others mentioned. Personally I’d be factoring some money into a water cooler too. I’d sacrifice the pedal before a cooler.
     
    Yellow peril, Tom Orrow L and dab4318 like this.
  12. Gizmo.Y Member

    Messages:
    727
    Skegness
    Overall, its a better machine. it works the way i intended it too.

    Issue i had with the parweld, is that 99% of my work is bench related, so i use the pedal most of the time. The isse was you could not preview the amperage set by the pedal, as once the pedal was plugged in, the pot dial on the side locked the panel, so you could not adjust amperage at the panel. The process was (as confirmed by Parweld). Pick up the pedal, Press pedal fully (This shows the MAX Amperage on the panel) then adjust the knob to desired Max Amperage.

    2 Issues with this, is i flashed myself several times in the first week of using it as whilst adjusting amperage. As with the pedal in your hand, the torch was live...it was also wasting gas at the same time...

    The R-Tech unit though has been great, The 210EXT was way out my range, but i realized that in order to get a machine to work the way i wanted it too, i had to up my budget. And it works exactly how i imagined a TIG Machine should work.

    Only issue ive had with the parweld is the torches, but i cannot fault R-Techs customer support. They have been great!
     
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  13. Jim Davey

    Jim Davey RH Davey Welding Supplies

    Messages:
    4,761
    Location:
    Southampton
    Just to note, if you depress the pedal fully the amperage display will show you the amps you'll get. If you adjust the pot at the same time (I pick the pedal up in my left hand and adjust the trimmer pot on the pedal with my right) you'll easily be able to set exactly the amperage you desire in no time.
    I also don't like amperage controls mounted on pedals, but I rarely need to change the amps once I've started a job but I can see it being more of an annoyance if it's something you need to do often.
     
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  14. Gizmo.Y Member

    Messages:
    727
    Skegness
    The Killer for me is on peices i do, i had to frequently change amps, which on the Parweld was a chore, on the R-Tech i just need to extend my left arm out and twist the knob.
     
  15. Phil Nichols New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    I recently bought an R-Tech 160 AC/DC Tig set up to learn to weld ally, particulary 1.6mm.
    I am still learning (need to get back out there and do some more) but it's far more capable than me but when I get it right it produces some really good solid welds.
    Also can't rate the customer support guys at R-Tech highly enough, I am really happy with my purchase.
     
    Ian James likes this.
  16. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

    Are you changing current via the pedal as you progress along each weld? I have never used a pedal, well did once or twice way back, so not sure what the big benefit of it is. I can see in Alu where blasting right down to get the heat in then backing off the further you progress along the weld but in all honesty that is not even a huge benefit for me as torch technique negates that need.

    BTW this is a serious question as I am intrigued why pedals are used so much.
     
    Mr Roo likes this.
  17. Jim Davey

    Jim Davey RH Davey Welding Supplies

    Messages:
    4,761
    Location:
    Southampton
    I find them really handy on casting repairs, where I might want to light up at a low amperage and see how the puddle develops, whether or not it's clean etc. It's also good at the end of a weld next to a machined surface for avoiding the dip at the edges or end of a weld that manifests itself as a low spot after machining. You can achieve the same thing by use of the slope up/down functions on a tig if you have them but a pedal gives an instant response and leaves your hands free for holding torch and filler. I'm not a fan of torch potentiometers and up down buttons on tig torches as I cant manage to operate them effectively without it affecting my torch positioning. Sure, I could practice and improve but I don't have to adapt my technique and invest time I don't want to spend time I can't spare learning a new technique when a foot pedal does all I want every time without fuss.
     
    Brad93 likes this.
  18. Richard.

    Richard. Member

    Messages:
    13,095
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    A pedal is a handy tool but it’s far from an essential tool. I use mine for aluminium bench work only. It comes in handy on small to medium sized parts parts that become heat soaked quickly. Where you might need 100 amps at the start of the joint it could end up you need 60 towards the end to keep control of the pool. It’s also very useful for getting perfect downslope with out the need of guess work pre setting the Machine. A pedal can be bad thing too because it takes away simple skill sets and welders can become dependent on them. A welder that has learned using nothing but a pedal struggles with conventional pool control technique such as using travel and filler to hang on it things. You also find a full time pedal welder knows next to nothing about current settings.
    I use a switch most of the time but I’d always have a pedal because there are jobs I take on where it just makes things that much nicer been able to drive your heat like a car throttle.
     
  19. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    2,806
    Location:
    Essex
    If you're welding a large part that acts as a heat sink then you can get away without a pedal on aluminium.
    If you're welding something 1.5mm thick that weighs a few hundred grams, you are going to struggle unless you can use backing bars as heat sinks.
     
  20. Gizmo.Y Member

    Messages:
    727
    Skegness
    Its obviously personal preference. Other than amperage control. I find the stress of holding the button/ trigger down can cause my hand to tremble, everyones different, but for me, this is how i feel. since 99% of my work is on the bench, i have 2 feet sat there doing nothing, so i put one to good use on the pedal.
     
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