Electrolysis

  1. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    326
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Evening, I've just picked up a complete rear subframe for my MK1 2.0 Ghia Focus estate for the princely sum of £40. Everything is there inc cross member, trailing arms, discs and coil springs. Plan is to refurb and swap for my existing set up which is in a bit of a state. Whilst it's off I can tidy up the underside at the same time.

    The plan was to disassemble and then do each part in an electrolysis bath. Having replaced various suspension components before I've often ended up cutting the old bolts off due to them being rusted on.

    Would it far fetched just to dump the whole assembly into a big electrolysis bath first then strip and paint each bit afterwards? Thinking it might anyway free up some of the fixings.

    Cheers
     
  2. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    2,449
    UK London
    Well worth cleaning off any oil and grease first but yes, it should free up rusted fixings nicely. If you're lucky it might even lift paint especially where there is rust underneath.
     
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  3. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    2,449
    UK London
    PS. last time I did a big thing I made a big tank...

    #75
     
  4. Parm

    Parm I only give advice if I know

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    Ive had limited success with electrolysis but others have had some real results

    Ive seen some of the car guys on here do various parts with good results
     
  5. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark If in doubt ask.

    Messages:
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    Wiltshire UK
    The only time electrolysis let me down was with turn of the century bench ends.

    But in the past I have done a SWB S2 land rover chassis and sub assembly. Ok I used a old arc welder, but it did the job.

    Time is your friend, plus cleaning the anodes up regally.

    But get as much of the grease, oil and crud off.

    Washing soda is dirt cheep.
     
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  6. rikrobson

    rikrobson Member

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    Location:
    Perth, Scotland
    You are going to need some big sacreficial anodes to do that but it should be eminently doable. What power supply were you thinking of using?
     
  7. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark If in doubt ask.

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    Location:
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    I used old crankshafts, flywheels and 2 lengths o railways track.

    I had as many as I could get in and around the chassis. I also wired up all the chassis and sub frames together to help.
     
  8. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    4,338
    Location:
    Kent
    so the annodes have to be cleanned regulary?
     
  9. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark If in doubt ask.

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    @123hotchef
    Yes, I find it helps, plus it removes a lot of rust from the tank.
    Get the anodes as close to the work as possible, get as much surface area on them as well.
     
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  10. 123hotchef Member

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    Location:
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    that is why i used brake discs great surface area i will clean them though just a scrape off
     
  11. rcx132

    rcx132 Philip

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    What will you use for a tank?
     
  12. 123hotchef Member

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    4,338
    Location:
    Kent
    i used a CWST for mine
     
  13. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    4,338
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    Kent
    [​IMG]
     
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  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    That looks brilliant, do you mind if I copy your idea on a slightly smaller scale for my 'new' one using an old recycling bin? :thumbup:
     
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  15. 123hotchef Member

    Messages:
    4,338
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    go for it mate
     
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  16. Mee Banned

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    Here and There
    I once saw an old cast iron bath used, it even stripped the enamelling off the bath.
     
  17. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    326
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Thanks all. Battery charger was the power source of choice. First plan was a 50gal plastic drum and do a "vertical tank". That was when I though the biggest bit was going to be the cross member.

    Looking at it assembled and it's bigger than I thought especially with the control arms sticking out. Maybe first port of call is some penetrating oil on the fixings and do as originally planned i.e. strip it. It's going to get costly if I say made a "tank" big enough.....EPDM membrane, roll of DPM, on a wooden frame etc both would be easy to puncture I think. Trying to think of a "structure" in the garden that I could adapt...the kids sandpit I build out of railway sleepers is a possibility...

    Selection_022.png
     
  18. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark If in doubt ask.

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    @Onoff
    Go to a wood recycling yard, by 2x 1.
    Go to a builders merchant obtain a sheet of 8' x4' sheet make a frame.
    Go to your local hard ware shop and at about £1 a meter by some polly tunnel sheet.
    Build to shape and size.
     
  19. Barlidge

    Barlidge Forum Supporter

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    123hotchef likes this.
  20. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    326
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    So a car battery charger will do it but will just take longer? Welder is better as quicker? Whats the key for quicker electrolysis, voltage or current?

    Cheers
     
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